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gri-index

GRI Index

For the period from January 1 - December 31st, 2018



GENERAL STANDARD DISCLOSURES
Standard Disclosure Standard Disclosure Title Comment

ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILE

102-1 Name of the organization Yamana Gold Inc. 
102-2 Activities, brands, products, and services
Gold, Silver, Copper
102-3 Location of the organization’s headquarters Toronto, Ontario, Canada
102-4 Number/name of countries where the organization operates Canada, Brazil, Chile, Argentina
102-5 Nature of ownership and legal form Yamana Gold Inc. is a publicly-traded corporation listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange and the New York Stock Exchange under the symbols YRI and AUY, respectively.
102-6 Markets served  Based in Canada, we are a gold producer engaged in gold mining and related activities including exploration, extraction, processing and reclamation. We have precious metal properties and land positions throughout the Americas including in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Canada.

Our Principal Product is gold, with its sale accounting for the majority of revenues. Yamana sells its precious metals into the worldwide commodities market at the spot price, and does not rely solely on one purchaser. We began producing gold-copper concentrate in 2007 at the Chapada mine, which added to the revenues and cash flows generated from our production. Yamana has contracts with a number of smelters, refineries and copper-trading companies to sell its gold-copper concentrate. 
102-7 Scale of the organization

Total number of Employees: 5090
Total number of Operations: 6 producing mines and 1 Joint-Venture
Net Revenues in 2018: $ 1.70 billion
Total Gold production in 2018: 940,619 ounces
Total Silver production in 2018: 8.02 M ounces
Total Copper production in 2018: 129 M ounces

102-8 Information on Employees and Other Workers 

Full Time Permanent Employees:
Male: 4691  (92%)
Female: 399 (8%) 
TOTAL: 5090

Total Part Time Employees: 
 Male:  165 (91%)
Female: 16  (9%)
TOTAL: 181

Total Female Employees: 415 (8%) 
Total Female Employees: 4856 (92%) 

By Region and Gender:
Argentina: Male: 1018- 92%  Female: 85- 8%   TOTAL: 1103
Brazil: Male: 1293- 89%  Female: 148- 11%  TOTAL: 1441
Canada: Male: 75- 54%  Female: 63- 46%  TOTAL: 138
Chile: Male: 1663- 96%  Female: 62- 4%  TOTAL: 1725
% of Contract Workers: 45%
Seasonal Variations: N/A

102-9 Supply chain description Yamana has a global supply chain with a host of local, regional, national and international suppliers. Countries our suppliers are from include: Argentina, Brazil and Chile. 
Below is a break down of the spend in each country.  
Country Amount (USD)
Argentina 151,200,000 
Brazil     410,500,000
Chile 378,500,000
Total 940,200,000
102-10 Significant changes in the organization and its supply chain. In Q2 of 2018 Yamana's Cerro Moro operation began production. As such, this operation is new to Yamana's disclosure. In addition, on December 14, 2018 Yamana sold the Gualcamayo operation in Argentina. This report continues with the inclusion of Gualcamayo through to the sale of the property
102-11 Precautionary approach / principle Mining can create significant environmental impacts, particularly if not managed adequately. For this reason, Yamana uses a precautionary approach in environmental and operational planning. We apply a hierarchy of environmental control/management when making decisions, with a constant aim to avoid, control, mitigate or offset any impacts and all issues.
102-12 External charters, principles or initiatives

All Yamana operations maintain external certification of:
- ISO 14001
- OHSAS 18001
- International Cyanide Management Code Standards


The company also uses the following guidelines in a non-required capacity:
- The IFC Performance Standards on Social and Environmental Sustainability
- The Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights

102-13 Memberships We are members of the following organizations:
• The Canadian Chamber of Commerce
• Ontario Mining Association
• Quebec Mining Association (l’Association minière du Québec )
• International Cyanide Management Code (ICMC) 
• Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC)
• World Gold Council
This list does not include professional associations such as the Canadian Bar Association or the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants, etc. 
 102-14Disclosure from senior decision maker See the 2018 Material Issues Report for the CEO statement. 
 102-15Key impacts, risks and Opportunities  See Yamana's Management Information Circular, the Annual Report and the Annual Information Form. 
 102-16Values, Principles, standards and norms or behavior The core values of Yamana are: Tenacity, Entrepreneurial Spirit, Responsibility, Transparency, Care & Respect, Honesty, Operational Excellence, Safe Work Environment, Integrity and Drive for Excellence.
 
Yamana Gold is committed to the highest standards of corporate governance practices. The Company and the Board of Directors recognize the importance of corporate governance to the effective management of the Company and to the protection of its employees and shareholders. Yamana's approach to significant issues of corporate governance is designed with a view to ensuring that the business and affairs of the Company are effectively managed to enhance shareholder value. For a current statement of Corporate Governance Practices, please refer to the most current Yamana Management Information Circular.  Code of conduct: http://www.yamana.com/English/company/ethics-and-governance/default.aspx 
 102-17Mechanisms for seeking advice and concerns about ethics Internal: Yamana maintains an anonymous ethics hotline that can be accessed by phone and by computer. 
External: Each operation maintains an active grievance mechanism that is accessible through a range of options (context specific).  
 102-18Governance Structure  Our board and its committees are highly engaged, and committed to strong stewardship and our long-term success. For a current statement of Corporate Governance Practices, please refer to the most current Yamana Management Informational Circular on Sedar (www.sedar.com).

Committees responsible for decision-making on economic, environmental and social impacts are:
1) Audit Committee
2) Compensation Committee
3) Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee
4) Sustainability Committee 
 102-19Process for delegating authority There are issue-specific mechanisms for communication, but generally speaking, operations (General Managers) report to the SVP of Operations and and functional SVPs at the corporate office (e.g. SVP Health, Safety & Sustainable Development), depending on the issue.  
 102-20Executive-level position(s) with responsibility for sustainability Appointed Executive-Level Positions:
Peter Marrone - Executive Chairman and Director of Yamana 
Daniel Racine -  President and Chief Executive Officer
Jason LeBlanc- Senior Vice President, Finance and Cheif Financial Officer
Yohann Bouchard - Senior Vice President, Operations
Richard Campbell - Senior Vice President, Human Resources
Gerardo Fernandez - Senior Vice President, Projects and Technical Services
Ross Gallinger - Senior Vice President, Health, Safety and Sustainable Development
Sofia Tsakos - Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary
Henry Marsden - Senior Vice President, Exploration
 
 102-21Process for consultation between stakeholders and the highest governance body For a current statement of Corporate Governance Practices, please refer to the most current Yamana Management Informational Circular on Sedar (www.sedar.com). 
 102-22Composition of the highest governance body Yamana's Board of Directors is comprised of 11  Directors who possess diverse and complementary skillsets that are well suited to provide strategic oversight to the company. 10 of the directors are independent.

For more information, see Yamana's Management Information Circular. 
 102-23Board Chair as executive officer* Peter Marrone founded Yamana in July 2003 and has been instrumental in the company’s strategic development and operational growth. Mr. Marrone currently serves as Executive Chairman and previously served as Yamana’s Chief Executive Officer from July 2003 until August 2018. A lead director, independent of management, is also in place.
 102-24Nomination and selection processes for the highest governance body and its committees See Yamana's Management Information Circular. 
 102-25Managing conflicts of interest  The board takes steps to ensure that our directors, executives and employees use sound judgment and understand: our code of conduct, the rules of reporting conflicts of interest, and the need to receive direction from the Lead Director and the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer about any potential conflicts of interest.  
 102-26Development, approval, and updating of the organization's purpose, strategies, policies, etc. The corporate HSEC team is in constant communication with sites and regional directors and reports to the Sr. Vice President of HSSD ( Health Safety and Sustainable Development). This team contributes to the strategy, development of standards & procedures and program design, with collaboration from sites as well as conducts company wide data analysis and reporting and provides support to sites, both in office as well as through ongoing site visits. In addition, to leading the HSEC team, the SVP HSSD, helps to implement policy and strategy as well as promotes dialogue on Yamana’s mission/vision. Any new developments or modifications to standards go through consultations across the General Managers of operations, regional directors, the senior executive team and ultimately the Board of Directors. The SVP reports directly to the CEO, and provides quarterly, and ad hoc updates to the Board of Directors. The SVP HSSD is directly responsible for overseeing all aspects of community relations, human rights, environment, closure and health and safety aspects at Yamana, Throughout 2018, the SVP Technical Services was responsible for overseeing the management of tailings, however, in early 2019, tailings was moved under the oversight of the SVP HSSD. Going forward, the SVP HSSD will be responsible for tailings management.  
 102-27Highest governance body's sustainability knowledge The highest governing body within the organization is the Board of Directors. The Board maintains a sustainability committee, and is designed specifically to review issues from the corporate office to the field. Yamana's Senior Vice-President of Health, Safety and Sustainable Development is responsible for the communication from the management team to the Board of Directors, as well as advancing their knowledge on these issues. 
The Sustainability Committee of the Board of Directors contributes to additional in-depth insight into the management of HSEC matters, which include: policies review, compliance issues and incidents, which ensures that the company continues to maintain its responsibilities and carries out actions to resolve such issues, while maintaining compliance. 
 102-28Evaluation of the highest governance body's performance on sustainability  Our governance practices meet the Canadian and United States requirements that apply to us, and best practices in general. We monitor governance developments to make sure our practices continue to be current and appropriate and support our high standards of governance and stewardship.

The board conducts a formal assessment of board and committee effectiveness, and the contribution of individual directors.
The board also assesses the performance of the CEO and other named executives. 
 102-29Highest governance body’s role in the identification and management of economic, environmental and social impacts, risks, and opportunities The Sustainability Committee of the Board of Directors assists the board in overseeing sustainability, environmental, health and safety matters:
• helps the board develop a corporate culture of environmental responsibility
and awareness about the importance of health and safety
• identifies the principal risks and impacts related to health, safety and the
environment, and ensures sufficient resources are allocated to address them
• oversees our corporate health, safety and environment policies and
management systems to ensure compliance with applicable laws and best
management practices
• counsels management in developing policies and standards as appropriate
• reviews management’s activities in maintaining appropriate internal and
external operational, health, safety and environment audits and reviews
the results
• reviews any compliance issues and incidents to determine, on behalf of
the board, that we are taking all necessary action and have been duly diligent
in carrying out our responsibilities and activities
• investigates or arranges an investigation of any unusual health, safety
and environmental performance
• reviews monthly and annual sustainability, health, safety and
environment reports
• reviews and approves annual disclosure relating to our sustainability,
health, safety and environment policies and activities 
 102-30Reviewing the effectiveness of the organization's risk management  The board has overall responsibility for risk oversight and each board committee is responsible for overseeing risk in particular aspects of our business. 

The board assesses the performance of the executives and other members of the senior management team throughout the year during specific business reviews and committee meetings. The board also provides regular updates on strategy development; safety, health and environmental results; business controls, and other areas that are critical to our general performance and sustainability

For more information, see the Management Information Circular for specific details 
 102-31Frequency of the highest governance body's review of economic, environmental and social impacts, risks, and opportunities The board's Sustainability Committee reviews sustainability, health, safety and environmental performance monthly and quarterly.  
 102-32Reviews and approval of sustainability report  The board's Sustainability Committee formally reviews and approves Yamana's sustainability report, and ensures that all material aspects are covered. 
 102-33Communicating critical concerns to the highest body Yamana maintains multiple communication channels for communicating critical concerns to its senior executive team and board of directors, depending on the nature and severity of the concern. 

At the center of our risk/incident control approach is the company's Risk Department (led by a Vice President of Risk Management). Upon review of a risk, concern or incident, the Risk function involves other relevant departments (Legal, HR, Internal Audit, Security, etc.) and may engage with external auditors, where necessary, to better evaluate a situation. For critical situations, senior management are notified immediately. 
 102-34Nature and total number of critical concerns Our Significant Incident Reporting Process ensures that actual and potential incidents of level 4 and higher are communicated to senior management and the board of directors. This process applies to all health and safety, environmental, and community (HSEC) incidents. Critical HSEC concerns are jointly managed by the site, regional HSEC directors and corporate. In-depth incident investigations take place on all actual and potential incidents, with lessons learned being shared across sites and with corporate. This process aims to reduce the potential of a similar incident occurring in the future, across all sites. 

In 2018 we had 95 significant incidents reported, 75% of which were of low actual consequence. 

In 2018 our Gualcamayo operation experienced a double fatality. A substantial internal investigation was conducted, and a number of key lessons learned from the event were incorporated at all of our sites that are exposed to similar risks and hazards. We had 0 significant environmental incidents as well as 0 significant social incidents.
 102-35Remuneration policies 

Yamana’s compensation philosophy supports our goal to be a recognized leader in precious metals mining by maintaining a strong entrepreneurial management team. Yamana motivates executives to focus on the long-term performance of the company by establishing a strong link between performance and compensation while building equity ownership. 

Yamana is guided by six compensation principles, approved by the board, which form the foundation for all decisions on executive pay and motivate the achievement of our corporate strategy. Compensation at Yamana is designed to: 

- Motivate and Retain
-Pay for Performance
-Pay varies based on results
-Align with business strategy
-Ensure internal equity
-Informed judgement 

Total Compensation at Yamana is comprised of a number of components, each contributing to a total package, designed to promote our philosophy of pay for performance. Compensation programs include base salary, short-term incentive awards, long-term incentive awards (Restricted Share Units, Performance Share Units, and Options) as well as pension, perquisites and benefits.   

The compensation framework is reviewed on an annual basis to ensure it is aligned with Yamana’s business strategy, and competitive against industry peers, who are similar in structure, size, and type of business, to ensure our compensation levels are appropriate.  

Yamana benchmarks compensation at the market median for expected levels of performance. The majority of what we pay our executives is variable (at risk), and based on performance to promote the achievement of our annual and longer-term strategies, with caps in place to limit payout levels. The proportion of at risk compensation increases with each executive level, and a significant portion is equity-based to focus executives on creating long-term value and to align with the interests of our shareholders.

Yamana uses a disciplined approach to assess performance based on specific measures and a pre-determined range of performance to determine company and individual performance.  Performance targets are set at the beginning of the performance period and  then assessed at the end of the performance period for achieved  results. Achievement results directly impact the value of short term and long term awards.  The board of directors also has an opportunity to provide informed judgment to adjust the awards upwards or downwards in response to overall company performance and market conditions.

The compensation committee works with its independent compensation advisor to review the compensation framework to make sure it reflects good business practices, is in line with regulatory expectations, and is structured so executives are not encouraged to take excessive risks.  

Strategies to manage risk in executive compensation include the following:
• Short-term incentives are based on corporate and individual performance. A balanced scorecard is used to assess corporate performance with pre-determined corporate performance measures and weightings, and threshold, target, stretch and maximize levels to cap the calculated scores and to discourage excessive risk-taking. 
• Long-term incentive awards are based on a suite of leading performance indicators to determine the size of grant. The award is allocated at least 50% to performance share units (PSUs) and the balance to restricted units and/or options so awards vest and pay out at different times.
• The board can use informed judgment to adjust the compensation awards up or down based on its review and assessment, as it deems appropriate. 
• All decisions about executive pay must be approved by the board. The Executive Chairman recuses himself from any board discussions about the Executive Chairman’s  pay. 
• Yamana directors, officers or employees are not allowed to hedge Yamana securities and does not re-price stock options or other equity incentive awards. 
• Yamana requires senior vice presidents and above, including the named executives, to own at least two times their annual salary in Yamana equity to reinforce our focus on the long term and align business decisions with shareholders’ interests. The Executive Chairman and the President and CEO must hold three times their annual base salary.   
• We continue to monitor regulatory developments, but do not currently have a policy. As a foreign private issuer, we will implement a claw back policy aligned with the requirements of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, once final guidelines have been confirmed.

Executives are also eligible to participate in the company’s defined contribution pension plan and are eligible for a perquisite allowance.  In addition, executives are  provided with local market competitive benefits including coverage of health, dental, vision, disability, life insurance and availability of an employee assistance and counseling program.

Management reviews the competitiveness of the company’s benefit plans annually with an independent benefits advisor.  There is considerable focus on ensuring benefit plans remain sustainable in an environment where benefit costs are on the rise.  The executive benefits are consistent in approach with the non-executive benefits but do have an enhanced component to help executives mitigate health concerns,  which in turn helps the company avoid unnecessary risks in the event of an executive impacted by health issues.

Termination payments are aligned to the market and are limited by specific clauses in each employment agreement.  The employment agreements of some senior executives include provisions for termination or other triggering event in a change of control situation at 2 times compensation for senior executives and 3 times compensation for the Executive Chairman and the President and CEO.

 102-36Process for determining remuneration Compensation decisions for senior executives are made by the compensation committee to the board of directors.  Yamana’s compensation decision-making process starts at the beginning of each year, when the compensation philosophy, program guidelines and structure is assessed and confirmed.   Performance measures are determined and targets set for the short-term incentive plan that aligns with corporate strategy. At the end of each year, a rigorous process is applied to assess performance and award compensation, which includes reviewing corporate, mine site and individual performance. The compensation committee, in consultation with its independent advisor, carries out the review and presents its recommendations to the board for review and approval.

The committee retains an independent advisor to attend committee meetings and provide ongoing support, including research and analysis, insights into market and compensation trends, and executive compensation.  The committee takes the advisor’s reports and recommendations into consideration when assessing compensation structure and awards, but makes its own decisions and recommendations to the board.  

The independence of the committee is reviewed and confirmed every year.  The compensation consultants do not have any other relationship with Yamana, with the exception of the employee engagement survey every three-year period, for which the consultant was already engaged by HR management prior to the selection of the consultants as advisors to the board.   The executive compensation consulting team is separate and distinct from the team that assists HR management with the employee engagement survey.  
 102-37Stakeholders' views and remuneration Yamana believes that shareholders advisory vote is important because it provides us with regular feedback on executive compensation. We are committed to engaging directly with shareholders on a proactive and ongoing basis. This year we reached out to 45% of our shareholder base in Canada, the United States and Europe.  

Our Executive Chairman, President and CEO, Chair of the Compensation Committee, Senior Vice President of Human Resources, Senior Vice President, General Counsel and / or Senior Vice President of Health, Safety and Sustainable Development typically attend these meetings. Topics tend to include our approach to governance practices and our approach to executive compensation.  
We also have a robust investor relations program. Our Executive Chairman, President and CEO, CFO, and other senior executives regularly meet current and prospective investors in one-on-one meetings, group meetings, investor conferences and site tours. The meetings generally include an investor presentation with updates on our strategic progress, operational and financial updates, and progress toward achieving our goals for the year.

Shareholders, employees and others can communicate directly with the board by writing to the Executive Chairman or the Lead Director c/o the Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary:

Yamana Gold Inc.
200 Bay Street
Royal Bank Plaza, North Tower
Suite 2200
Toronto, Ontario M5J 2J3

Or email investor@yamana.com. 
 102-40List of stakeholder groups engaged by the organization With multiple operations across four operating countries, the list of stakeholders that Yamana engages is far too large to list in terms of specifics. The following is an overview of the types of stakeholder groups we engage with on a regular basis:
- Employees and employee families
- Indigenous communities and traditional leaders
- Local citizens (as individuals, through multiple different engagement venues)
- Local municipalities and leaders
- Local citizens groups 
- Civil society groups (NGOs)
- Religious and faith-based organizations 
- Municipal, Regional and National authorities and planners
- Host governments 
- Industry associations
- Academia
- Suppliers and contractors
- Investors and investment research organizations 
 102-41Percentage of total employees covered by collective bargaining agreements 80% 
 102-42Indentifying and selecting stakeholders We take an inclusive approach to identifying stakeholders at Yamana. From the corporate level to operations, we define stakeholders not only as those who are impacted by (or have an impact on) our company, but also those who have a general or specific interest in the company. While each operation maintains a unique, culturally-specific approach to stakeholder engagement, we ensure that an appropriate and inclusive stakeholder mapping process is always at the foundation of an engagement strategy. 
  102-43Organization's approach to stakeholder engagement Each operation maintains a unique approach to stakeholder engagement. The effort is to engage all stakeholders who are impacted by, or interested in our operations. Our engagement is guided by internal policies and standards around community and stakeholder engagement, specifically, our Social Responsibility Policy, our HSEC Framework and our Standard for Communication with Stakeholders. 

At the core of our approach to engagement is our belief that transparent, honest and meaningful dialogue with communities is central to establishing and maintaining a social license to operate. We also maintain both formal and informal active grievance mechanisms to ensure that there are multiple channels of dialogue available to communities and external stakeholders to express their concerns.
 
 102-44 Key topics and concerns raised through stakeholder engagement The key topics and concerns for our operations vary by operation and by country. The most common issues as they relate to feedback through stakeholder engagement processes are as follows:
- Jobs
- Contracts and local procurement
- Concerns around dust, noise and/or vibration (location specific)
- General environmental concerns (e.g. impacts on water quality or quantity). 

For a more detailed explanation, as well as a breakdown of key topics and concerns by stakeholder group please see our 2018 Material Issues Report. 
  102-45Entities included in consolidated financial statements  a. See Yamana's Annual Report. 
b. Canadian Malartic is not covered by the report. In addition, operations to which Yamana holds shares but is not the primary operator are also not included in this report.  
  102-46Defining report content and topic boundaries-  Stakeholder inclusiveness: This report aims to provide content that is material to Yamana and all of its' stakeholders, while also recognizing that some groups of stakeholders will utilize the report more frequently and more thoroughly. When identifying and defining who our stakeholders are, we strongly believe that it is in our best interest to take a view that is as broad and holistic as possible. From the corporate level to the operations, we define stakeholders not only as those who are impacted by (or have an impact on) our company, but also those who have a general or specific interest in the company. 

Materiality: The 2018 Material Issues Report is available on our website and covers the issues that are most significant to Yamana, and our stakeholders. These issues cover sustainability aspects, including our economic, environmental and social performance. The information presented provides our stakeholders with clear information that allows our performance to be analyzed.

Sustainability Context: The Report and this GRI index features Yamana's specific performance across a wide range of concepts. In some instances, the performance speaks for itself, but using our professional judgment, we have made efforts to contextualize the data where possible. 

Completeness: We feel that the information contained in the Report and the GRI index provides a very complete overview of the company's sustainability performance. We have not had the report externally assured, but we continue to review the value of external assurance on a year-by-year basis.  
  102-47List of Material Topics - The 2018 Material Issues Report looks at the following material aspects, which were identified as the 'most material' to Yamana and its' stakeholders, with regards to issues of Health, Safety and Sustainability:
-Governance
-Business Ethics/ Human Rights
-Health & Safety
-Community Relations/Social License
-Water
-Waste/Tailings Management
-Climate Change/Biodiversity
-Closure 
 102-50Reporting period 2018 Calendar Year 
  102-51Most recent report 2017 
  102-52Reporting cycle Annual 
  102-53Contact point Ross Gallinger, Senior Vice President, Health, Safety & Sustainable Development (Ross.Gallinger@Yamana.com) 
  102-54Claims of Reporting in accordance with GRI Standards This report has been prepared in accordance with the GRI Standards: Comprehensive option.  
  102-55GRI Content Index* In this report you will find disclosure on: 
 GRI 101- Foundation 2016
GRI 102- General Disclosures
GRI 103- Management Approach
GRI 201- Economic Performance
GRI 202- Market Presence
GRI 203- Indirect Economic Impacts
GRI 204 - Procurement Practices
GRI 205- Anti-Corruption 2016
GRI 206: Anti-Competitive Behavior
GRI 301: Materials 2016
GRI 302: Energy 2016
GRI 303 :Water 2016
GRI 304: Biodiversity 2016
GRI 305: Emissions 2016 
GRI 306: Effluents and Waste 2016 
GRI 307 Environmental Compliance 2016
GRI 401: Employment 2016
GRI 402: Labor/Management Relations 2016
GRI 403: Occupational Health and Safety 2016
GRI 404: Training  and Education 2016
GRI 405: Diversity and Equal Opportunity 2016
GRI 406: Non-Discrimination 2016
GRI  407: Freedom of Speech and Association 2016
GRI 408: Child Labor 2016
GRI 409: Forced and Compulsory Labor 2016
GRI 410: Security Practices 2016
GRI  411: Rights of Indigenous Peoples 2016
GRI 412: Human Rights Assessment 2016
GRI 413: Local Communities 2016
GRI 414: Supplier Social Assessment 2016
GRI 415: Public Policy 2016
GRI 416 Customer Health and Safety 2016- Excluded. Not Applicable 
GRI 417: Marketing and Labelling 2016- Excluded. Not Applicable 
GRI 418 Customer Privacy 2016- Excluded. Not Applicable
GRI 419: Socio Economic Compliance 2016 
  102-56External assurance* This report is not externally assured  

ECONOMIC

103-1Explanation of material topic and its boundary*Each material topic is chosen is through dialogue with a variety of the company's stakeholders. Full information regarding the process of determining materiality, the boundary and extent of impact of each material topic as well as the organization's involvement with the impacts is discussed in detail in the 2018 Material Issues Report.
103-2The Management Approach and its components
Our management approach to Health, Safety, Environment and Community (HSEC) , is focusing on embedding a company-wide HSEC culture. We are focused on the full integration of HSEC into all operations, and functions of the organization, shifting away from a more traditional audit-based approach, to a more proactive and engaged approach.  This shift highlights our belief that HSEC is everybody’s responsibility, and it encourages preventative actions towards HSEC incidents, which will allow us to progress towards our vision of One Team, One Goal: Zero.

Another core tool that helps us further deepen the integration of HSEC into our company is the HSEC Management Framework, which provides strategic guidance on Health & Safety, Environment and Community Relations. The Framework is also and intentionally focused on management effectiveness, and the transition towards the complete integration of HSEC responsibilities throughout the entirety of our Company. This innovative and comprehensive framework was developed with the sites in 2016 and became fully integrated into Yamana in mid-2017. The Framework is composed of 5 pillars, Leadership, People, Planning, Systems & Processes, and Performance, and 3 functional elements, Health & Safety, Environmental Management, and Social Risk Management. This primarily risk-based Framework highlights best practices across the industry and allows our operations to develop site-specific strategies and improvement plans while still being unified in their approaches to HSEC management. 

At Yamana, we have over 85 different HSEC policies and standards. These policies range from general management (risk assessment and management, document management and legal requirements etc.), to more theme-specific policies and procedures on a wide range of critical risk controls. While most of these standards and procedures are internal documents, some of our more important documents, such as our Human Rights Policy, Code of Conduct and Integrity Helpline, can be found on our website and are explored more in-depth in the Business Ethics and Human Rights section of our 2018 Material Issues Report, which will be available in mid-2019. 

Material Topics are the responsibility of their respective SVP, who are outlined in 102-20. Each SVP reports directly to the CEO and provides regular updates to the Board of Directors. 

Grievances are directly managed on a site-by-site basis, and are addressed based on the nature of the grievance. Sites provide regular reporting to General Managers as well as the corporate HSEC team, the SVP HSSD, the CEO and the Board of Directors on the grievances received and seek guidance on any grievances which needs to be escalated further. In 2018, all grievances were closed within the designated closeout period.

103-3Evaluation of the Management Approach 

Material Topics, and their evaluations are discussed in detail in our 2018 Material Issues Report, Which will be available mid 2019

ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE

201–1  2018 Summary of Corporate Investments, Donations, Taxes and Royalties in USD
Direct Community Investment Donations & Sponsorship Tax & Royalties
Argentina $ 3,408,098 $ 204,200 $ 10,821,029
Brazil $ 459,154 $ 492,131 $ 146,174,320
Canada $ 398,150 $ 523,250 $ 70,758
Chile $ 6,168 $ 739,308 $ 2,237,247
Other $ - $ - $ 271,023
Total $ 4,271,570 $ 1,958,889 $ 159,574,377
201-2 Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization's activities due to climate change See the climate change section of our 2018 Material Issues Report which will be released in mid 2019.
201-3 Coverage of the organization's defined benefit plan obligations All full-time, permanent employees are eligible to participate in a Pension Plan. Yamana's Pension Plan helps employees to reach their income goals for retirement. Yamana makes defined contributions to the plan and employees are also able to make voluntary contributions. The plan is available in all regions and is designed to complement local government social security systems. The Company's contributions are based on the employee's gross annual base salary and in accordance with their years of service.  Varies by region and by plan provider. Options are available for low, medium and high risk portfolios and employees have the ability to transition to different funds and manage their investment personally.
201-4 Financial assistance received from government

Yamana receives financial assistance in the form of tax stability agreements, tax holidays and various government incentive programs.  The tax holiday entered into with the Superintendência do Desenvolvimento do Nordeste in Brazil resulted in tax savings of R$26,354,702 during 2018.  The tax holiday was implemented to attract investments to the Northeastern area of Brazil.  The Company has to meet certain employment and investment conditions in order to qualify for the incentive.  In Brazil, there are also various tax incentives for exporters with the Federal and State governments that allows purchases to be made without incurring indirect taxes


MARKET PRESENCE

202-1 Ratios of standard entry level wage by gender compared to local minimum wage
Based on the compliance with local legislation and the application of a competitive compensation policy all regions compensate their employees, without gender distinction, above the minimum wage rules.
202-2 Proportion of senior management hired from the local community at significant locations of operationArgentina: 59% of Senior Management hired from Local Region.
Brazil: 35% of Senior Management hired from Local Region.
Canada: 100% of Senior Management hired from Local Region.
Chile: 70% of Senior Management hired from Local Region.

"Senior Managers" includes any employee in a position of Senior Leadership. At Yamana, this includes any employee at superintendent level or above. For the purposes of this indicator, the term "local" is defined by the region or state where our operations are located. Preference is given to the town and surrounding towns located near the mine. "Significant Location of Operation" is defined as units where we operate.

INDIRECT ECONOMIC IMPACTS

203-1 Development and impact of infrastructure investments and services supported The financial figures for these types of contributions can be found in EC1. At this point, we do not have a detailed breakdown of each operation’s specific infrastructure contributions.
203-2 Significant indirect economic impacts, including the extent of impacts Our operations have a range of direct and indirect impacts on the regions and the communities where they are located, specifically in the areas of local business development and local economic development.
Local Business Development: Beyond the direct jobs created by the mines and suppliers of our operations, local businesses experience the benefits of local economic growth through increased wages and spending capacities, particularly of families who benefit from direct wages from the operations. 

Local procurement: 21.19%%
Regional procurement: 54.65%
National procurement: 93.7%

Local Economic Development: Our operations provide direct contributions towards local economic development. Yamana's main pillars of community investment initiatives are called the Integrar Program and the Partnership Alliance initiative.  Investing in 67 unique projects throughout our host communities, our Integrar programs reached over 41,000 people in 2018, focusing on support in areas of environment, human rights, health, education, entrepreneurship and culture.  
Within the Integrar Program, most of our sites also host Integrar Days in conjunction with local authorities. This activity consists of one or two days where community members can receive free services which are not readily accessible in that community. In 2018, over 49,000 people attended Integrar Days, which focused on health services, education, environment, culture and quality of life. 

For more information, see indicator 201-1 for direct contributions and our 2018 Material Issues Report.

PROCUREMENT PRACTICES

204-1 Proportion of spending on local suppliers at significant locations of operation Local and regional supply chains are an important way for our company to add direct and indirect value to our host communities and host governments. 

- 93.7% of all of our purchasing was done within our host countries in 2018

- 33.46% of our purchasing was regional (includes local); and  

- 21.2% was local

We define regional as within the state/province of operation and we define local as our neighboring/host communities, which is defined uniquely by each operation. In some instances, our 'local' communities are those within 5-25km and in other instances, our 'local' communities are as far away as 100km.

ENVIRONMENTAL

MATERIALS

301-1 Materials used by weight or volume See tables below for a complete overview of materials used:

Materials used (t)

Minera Florida Chapada Jacobina Cerro Moro El PeñónGualcamayo
Caustic soda 2,757- 730 28 155
Cyanide 1,236-7037732,6312,216
Explosives (ANFO) 1,31316,9502,5241622,10661,058
Flocculants 6448341 140 0
Grinding balls 1,310 11,0343,542511,521 -
HCL - 2 149 0 210
Lime - 12,699 1,070 709 -10,744
Tires - 413,300 37 19 1,046 2,653
Other reagents -1,045149- 1,076 14
Total materials used 6,680455,0338,9871,783 8,520 77,080
301-2 Percentage of materials used that are recycled input materials

El Penon: 1.6%
Jacobina: 1.38%
Minera Florida: <1%

All other sites ether did no report or did not use a significant amount of material.

 301-3Percentage of products sold and their packaging materials that are reclaimed by category N/A  

ENERGY

302–1 Energy Consumption
Minera Florida Chapada Jacobina Cerro Moro El Peñón Gualcamayo Total
Fuels (MWh) 39,917 465,831 62,661 165,024 103,058 135,417 971,908
Electricity (MWh) 64,010 334,921 113,397 Electricty is generated through disel usage. The diesel usage to generate electricity is captured in the above cell 102,162 46,103 660,593
Total 103,927 800,752 176,058 165,024 205,220 181,520 1,632,501
302-2 Energy consumption outside of the organization We do not track this as it is not a material number for the organization.
302-3 Energy intensity 15.8 MWh/ thousand tonnes moved.
This was calculated by taking the total energy consumption in MWh, and dividing it by the total rock moved in tonnes.
Types of energy included in the intensity are electricity and fuels.
The ratio uses energy consumed within the organization.
302-4 Reduction of energy consumption

Total energy use changed from: 1,335,265 MWh to 1,632,500 MWh between 2017 and 2018. This change is due in large part to our Cerro Moro operation coming online in Q2 of 2018, which was not included in our 2017 disclosure. In addition, due to the nature of mining, and the frequent changes in ownership of operations, we do not track our emissions in relation to a base year. 

Each site develops and maintains its own energy reduction program, as energy requirements vary across sites due to location, type of mine and climate. Some examples of site initiatives from 2018 include: 

Jacobina : completed a variety of projects across the operation with the goal of reduction such as Secondary fan automation that reduces power consumption and results in better control of fans.  Change in water monitoring to help with reliability with data logger, reports on flows and pumping, process stabilization of the crushing area, maintenance of damaged water pipes, and maintenance of submersible pump.

El Penon: Installation of 14 solar panels for light in the camp. Each panel saves 40 watts an hour. 

Gualcamayo: Replaced halogen lights with LED Lights. 

Minera Florida: Conducted an energy audit of its plant area, which provided various projects to reduce energy consumption. 

302-5 Reductions in energy requirements of products and services N/A

WATER

303-1 Total water withdrawal by source See table below:
Data presented in m3

Minera Florida Chapada  JacobinaCerro Moro El Peñón Gualcamayo Total
Surface Water including water from wetlands, rivers, lakes and oceans 249,0111,313,000147,971---1,709,982
Groundwater 310,82871,063221,513599,2631,467,1402,669,807
Third-party water (municipal water, other) -------
Mine Water 138,70011,392,8581,548,540-617,521-13,697,619
Total Water Withdrawal by Source (m³) 698,53912,776,9211,696,511221,5131,216,7841,467,14018,077,408
302-2 Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal of water Jacobina: Cuia Dam
Chapada: Rio dos Bois
Minera Florida: Aluhe Estuary  
303-3 Percentage and total volume of water recycled and reused See table below:
Minera Florida Chapada Jacobina  Cerro MoroEl Peñón Gualcamayo Total
Total water withdrawal (m3) 698,53912,776,9211,696,511221,5131,216,7841,467,14018,077,408
Total water reused or recycled (m3) 599,83944,451,7403,837,000178,8695,039,43810,827,69164,894,571
Reused and recycled as percentage of water withdrawal 80%348%226%81%414%738%359%
Reused and recycled as percentage of total water use 44%78%69%45%81%88%78%
303-4 Total water discharge by quality and destination
Minera Florida Chapada Jacobina Cerro Moro El Peñón Gualcamayo
Total volume of water discharges (m3) 100 N/A N/A 18,250 N/A 60,000
Destination of water discharged Local Estuary N/A N/A Discharge Environment N/A Infiltration system for treated wastewater and use for irrigation
Treatment method for water discharge and quality of the water No treatment was required as the quality met the local standards N/A N/A Aerobic treatment and Chlorination N/A Sewage treatment plant (aerobic)

BIODIVERSITY

304-1 Operational sites owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas
Three of our sites (50%) are located near high biodiversity value areas and have management plans in place: Minera Florida, Chapada and Jacobina. The biodiversity areas located near Chapada and Jacobina are managed and regulated by the Brazilian Forest Code.
 304-2 Description of significant impacts of activities, products, and services on biodiversity in protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas  With the exception of our Minera Florida operation, none of our operations are located in protected areas or in areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas.  Minera Florida is an underground mining operation, and as such, the nature of our direct impacts on biodiversity are limited to the process plant, waste facilities (including tailings and waste rock) and associated support infrastructure (e.g. administration buildings, water management systems, roads, etc.).  Introduction of substances that do not naturally occur in the habitat include dust, emissions from mobile equipment, traffic and noise.  Although there has been a reduction of species due to the footprint of our operations, there was no newly disturbed land in 2017 or 2018 and we reforested 113 hectares of land in 2018 (see indicator 304-2 and 304-3 for further details).  Direct biodiversity impacts include one IUCN endangered species and six protected species (see indicator 304-4 for further details), although these species are not unique to the site.  The extent of areas affected by our Minera Florida operation is 270 hectares.  Biodiversity impacts are considered reversible, as the site will be rehabilitated following full decommissioning and closure of the operation.  
Habitats protected or restored
Minera Florida Chapada Jacobina El Peñón Cerro Moro Gualcamayo
Size & location of all habitat protected areas or restored areas (ha), & whether the success of the restoration measure was or is approved by independent external professionals Reforestation of 113.5 hectares in the El Membrillo estate. 1,958 hectares of Legal Reserve and Permanent Protection Areas Jacobina has a legal reserve of 56.73 hectares and 28 hectares of restoration at a Tailings Dam, this specific area was reshaped for planting in 2017. Protected Area: 2821 ha - State Park of Sete Passagens. - - -
Partnerships with third parties to protect or restore habitat areas distinct from where the organization has overseen and implemented restoration or protection measures Between 2014 and 2016, a voluntary project, Biodiversity Conservation Plan was developed and carried out with the University of Chile. Hiring of specialized consultancy to carry out planting with native seedlings on 105 hectares. - - - -
Status of each area based on its condition The reforestation areas are protected, isolated, fenced and with access control. The areas of Legal Reserve and Areas of Permanent Protection are characterized for the most part by the vegetal typology. The areas are in a good state of preservation. Tailings Dam in process of restoration - - -
Standards, methodologies & assumptions used Based on Law N° 19.300 of the General Basis of the Environment of Chile & the Native Forest Law - - - - -
304–3 Habitats protected or restored
See table below:
Data presented in hectares
Minera Florida Chapada Jacobina  Cerro Moro El Peñón Gualcamayo Total
Previous year disturbed and not yet rehabilitated 0.0 73.8 17.4 295  0.0 0.0 386.2
Newly disturbed land 0.0 183.0 1.1 77.0  0.0 0.0 261.1
Newly rehabilitated land 113.0 85.0 28.0 0.0  0.0 0.0 226.0
Current year disturbed and not yet rehabilitated 0.0 171.8 -9.5 372.0  0.0 0.0 534.3
304-4 Total Number of IUCN Red List species and national conservation list species with habitats in areas affected by operations, by level of extinction
Minera Florida Chapada Jacobina Cerro Moro El Peñón Gualcamayo Total
Critically endangered - - - 0 - - 0
Endangered 1 3 1 0 - - 5
Vulnerable 6 8 2 0 - - 16
Near threatened - - 2 1 - - 3
Least concern - - 23 31 - - 54

EMISSIONS

305-1 Direct greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (Scope 1) See table below:
Site tCO2e
Chapada 129,358
Jacobina  17,934
Gualcamayo 48,865
El Peñon 28,092
Minera Florida  10,858
Cerro Moro    44,307
 Total   279,4

Energy indirect greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (Scope 2) See table below:
Site tCO2e
Chapada 24,857
Jacobina 8,416
Gualcamayo 17,218
El Peñon  41,521
Minera Florida 26,015
Cerro Moro -
 Total118,027 
305-3 Other indirect greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (Scope 3) We do not collect data on this indicator.
305-4 Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity The types of GHG emissions included in the intensity ratio are direct (scope 1) and indirect (scope 2).
Site Intensity (tCO2e/k tonnes moved)
Chapada 1.97
Jacobina 9.48
Gualcamayo 5.18
El Peñon 37.3
Minera Florida 34.1
Cerro Morro 6.66
Yamana 3.84
305-5 Reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions

TTotal GHG Emissions (Scope 1 and Scope 2) changed from 334,969  to  397,450 tCO2e between 2017 and 2018. This change is due in large part to our Cerro Moro operation coming online in Q2 of 2018, which was not included in our 2017 disclosure. In addition, due to the nature of mining and the frequent changes in ownership of operations we do not track our emissions in relation to a base year. 

Each site develops and maintains its own energy reduction program, as energy requirements vary across sites due to location, type of mine and climate. Some examples of site initiatives from 2018 include: 

Jacobina underwent a variety of projects across the operation with the goal of reduction. Examples include: Secondary fan automation which reduces power consumption and results in better control of fans.  Change in water monitoring to help with reliability with data logger, reports on flows and pumping, process stabilization of the crushing area, maintenance of damaged water pipes, and maintenance of submersible pump.

El Penon: Installation of 14 solar panels for light in the camp. Each panel saves 40 watts an hour. 

Gualcamayo: replacing halogen lights with LED lights. 

Minera Florida: Conducted an energy audit of its plant area which provided various projects to reduce energy consumption.  

305-6 Emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODS) 0
305-7 Nitrogen oxides (NOX), sulfur oxides (SOX), and other significant air emissions
At this time, this information is not tracked at every site. In the below data it should be noted that the Jacobina data is calculated by estimation, using data from a third party that measures the emissions every 6  months.

NOX                                                                                   SOX
Cerro Moro: 3997.41 KG                                            Cerro Moro: Not Calculated at this time 
Florida; 1180KG                                                             Florida: 500 kg
Jacobina: 208                                                                  Jacobina: 180 
 

EFFLUENTS AND WASTE

303–4 Total water discharge by quality and destination
Minera Florida Chapada Jacobina Cerro Moro El Peñón Gualcamayo
Total volume of water discharges (m³) 100 N/A N/A 18,250 N/A 60,000
Destination of water discharged Local Estuary N/A N/A Discharge Environment N/A Infiltration system for treated wastewater and use for irrigation
Treatment method for water discharge and quality of the water No treatment was required as the quality met the local standards N/A N/A Aerobic treatment and Chlorination N/A Sewage treatment plant (aerobic)
306-2 Total weight of waste by type and disposal method (t)
Minera Florida Chapada Jacobina Cerro Moro El Peñón Gualcamayo Total
Reused - - - 382 - - 382
Recycled - 635 902 43 883 258 2,721
Composted - - 1 - - - 1
Recovered - 308 74 1 - - 383
Incinerated 324 154 - 3 - 1,140 1,621
Landfill 597 134 87 230 1,422 - 2,470
On-site storage - - - 100 797 - 897
Other - 315 137 1,274 1,214 2,940
Total Waste (hazardous and non-hazardous) 921 1,546 1,201 759 4,376 2,612 11,415
306 – 4 Hazardous Waste Handling (tonnes)
Minera Florida Chapada Jacobina Cerro Moro El   Peñón Gualcamayo Total
Transported - 512.0 124.3 295.0 1,813.0 1,141.0 3,885.3
Imported - - - - - - -
Exported - - - - - - -
Treated 324.0 - - - - - 324.0
Total 324.0 512.0 124.3 295.0 1,813.0 1,141.0 4,209.3

COMPLIANCE

307-1 Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations See table below:
Minera Florida Chapada Jacobina Cerro Moro El Peñón Gualcamayo Total
Monetary value of significant fines ($ USD) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A $-
Number of non-monetary sanctions N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 0

SUPPLIER ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

308-1 Percentage of new suppliers that were screened using environmental criteria 100%. 
All suppliers are required to sign and comply with Yamana's Code of Conduct. Within the Yamana Code of Conduct is a section on Environmental Stewardship, this section outlines The Yamana Way as well as activities to avoid. For more insight into topics covered please, see the Code of Conduct available on Yamana's website. In addition to the Code of Conduct HSEC topics are provided by the local HSEC team as a criteria for evaluation according to the material/service related to the respective bidding.  
308-2 Significant actual and potential negative environmental impacts in the supply chain and actions taken We do not collect data on this indicator.

METALS AND MINING SUPPLEMENT

 G4-MM1
Amount of land (owned or leased, and managed for production activities or extractive use) disturbed or rehabilitated
 
Please see 304-3 
 G4-MM2
The number and percentage of total sites identified as requiring biodiversity management plans according to stated criteria, and the number (percentage) of those sites with plans in place 
 
Three of our sites (50%) are located near high biodiversity value areas and have management plans in place: Minera Florida, Chapada and Jacobina.
The biodiversity areas located near Chapada and Jacobina are managed and regulated by the Brazilian Forest Code, with the area near Florida being monitored by the Chilean Ministry of Envrionment. 
 
G4-MM3 Total amount of overburden, rock, tailings
Minera Florida Chapada Jacobina El Peñón Cerro Moro Gualcamayo Total
Overburden(Waste Rock) (t) 711,267 42,920,400 686,051 1,215,950 6,416,533 5,507,506 57,457,707
Tailings (t) 822,589 22,685,819 2,044,540 1,103,834 199,446 N/A (Heap Leach) 26,856,228
 G4-MM4Number of strikes and lock-outs exceeding 1 week duration by country None.
 G4-MM-5
Total number of operations taking place in or adjacent to indigenous people's territories, and number and percentage of operations or sites where there are formal agreements with indigenous peoples' communities
 
None

In Canada, our exploration project is in the traditional territories of indigenous communities. In  2018, a formal exploration agreement was signed with one community. We are in the early phase of negotiating with other indigenous communities for another project in Canada. 
 
 G4-MM6
Number and description of significant disputes relating to land use, customary rights of local communities and indigenous peoples
 
None.  
 G4-MM7
The extent to which grievance mechanisms were used to resolve disputes relating to land use, customary rights of local communities and indigenous people, and the outcomes
 
None.  
 G4-MM8 
Number (and percentage) of company operating sites where artisanal and small-scale mining (asm) take place on, or adjacent to, the site; the associated risks and the actions taken to manage and mitigate these risks 
 
There is a  small scale mining operation in the general vicinity of the Jacobina  mine site but not directly adjacent to it.

Jacobina maintains a security patrol program, which includes monitoring remote areas by drone in order to manage the potential risks. 

 G4-MM9Sites where resettlements took place, the number of households resettled in each, and how their livelihoods were affected in the process.  None.  
 G4-MM10Number and percentage of operations with closure plans All our operations have active closure plans with appropriately allocated financial provisions (asset retirement obligation), which total $274.3 M for the company as of December 31, 2017. 
Number of strikes and lock-outs exceeding one week's duration, by country
Number of strikes and lock-outs exceeding one week's duration, by country
Number of strikes and lock-outs exceeding one week's duration, by country
Number of strikes and lock-outs exceeding one week's duration, by country
Number of strikes and lock-outs exceeding one week's duration, by country
Number (and percentage) of company operating sites where artisanal and small-scale mining (asm) take place on, or adjacent to, the site; the associated risks and the actions taken to manage and mitigate these risks
Number (and percentage) of company operating sites where artisanal and small-scale mining (asm) take place on, or adjacent to, the site; the associated risks and the actions taken to manage and mitigate these risks
Number (and percentage) of company operating sites where artisanal and small-scale mining (asm) take place on, or adjacent to, the site; the associated risks and the actions taken to manage and mitigate these risks
Number (and percentage) of company operating sites where artisanal and small-scale mining (asm) take place on, or adjacent to, the site; the associated risks and the actions taken to manage and mitigate these risks
Number (and percentage) of company operating sites where artisanal and small-scale mining (asm) take place on, or adjacent to, the site; the associated risks and the actions taken to manage and mitigate these risks
Number (and percentage) of company operating sites where artisanal and small-scale mining (asm) take place on, or adjacent to, the site; the associated risks and the actions taken to manage and mitigate these risks
Number (and percentage) of company operating sites where artisanal and small-scale mining (asm) take place on, or adjacent to, the site; the associated risks and the actions taken to manage and mitigate these risks
Number and percentage of operations with closure plans
Number and percentage of operations with closure plans
Number and percentage of operations with closure plans
Number and percentage of operations with closure plans
Number and percentage of operations with closure plans
Number and percentage of operations with closure plans
Number and percentage of operations with closure plans

SOCIAL

SUB-CATEGORY: LABOR PRACTICES AND DECENT WORK

EMPLOYMENT

401-4 Total number and rates of new employee hires and employee turnover by age group, gender and region
Argentina
New Hires M F Terminations M F
< 20:
50< 20:10
 21 - 30: 11812 21 - 30: 42
 31 - 40:100 31 - 40: 119 12 
 41 - 50:56 41 - 50: 98  4
 >51:16 >51: 47 
Brazil
New Hires M F Terminations M F
< 20: 18 18 >20: 9 10
21 - 30: 147 34 21-30: 39 24
31 - 40: 151 15 31-40: 38 8
41 - 50: 37 0 41-50: 19 3
>51: 0 0 >51: 18 1
Canada
New Hires M F Terminations M F
< 20: 0 0 < 20: 9 10
21 - 30: 3 4 21-30: 39 24
31 - 40: 8 5 31-40: 38 8
41 - 50: 8 5 41-50: 19 3
> 51: 6 1 >51: 18 1
Chile
New Hires M F Terminations M F
< 20: 4 0 < 20: 0 0
21 - 30: 87 12 21-30: 15 6
31 - 40: 142 4 31-40: 38 7
41 - 50: 74 5 41-50: 52 2
>51: 42 0 >51: 34 1
401-2 Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees, by significant locations of operation Benefits provided to full-time employees include: life insurance, short and long-term disability coverage, healthcare (including such things as medical, dental, vision, hospital and pharmaceutical, etc.). Each operation designs its benefit plans in accordance with the needs of their employees and in line with local market best practices. 
401-3 Return to work and retention rates after parental leave, by gender Apply to all employees.
Female: 16                      
15 out of 16 employees returned to work after parental leave.

LABOR/MANAGEMENT RELATIONS

402-1 Minimum notice periods regarding operational changes, including whether these are specified in collective agreements In accordance to jurisdictional labour legislation and dependable to business circumstances and magnitude of the change.

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY

G4-LA5 Percentage of total workforce represented in formal joint management-worker health and safety committees that help monitor and advise on occupational health and safety programs Percentage of total workforce represented in formal joint management-worker health and safety committees that help monitor and advise on occupational health and safety programs 100% of our employees are represented by formal joint management-worker health and safety committees, including at our corporate office. 

The H&S committees are made up of senior, mid and lower level employees and report to the highest levels of management at each operation. .
G4-LA6 Type of injury and rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and total number of work-related fatalities, by region and by gender See our 2018 Material Issues Report which will be available mid 2019 for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-LA7 Workers with high incidence or high risk of diseases related to their occupation All workers are monitored by medical examiners according to their risk exposure. Where there are specific risks identified, appropriate precautions are taken. 
G4-LA8 Health and safety topics covered in formal agreements with trade unions All agreements cover aspects of health and safety. These vary from site-to-site and from country-to-country.
 403-1Occupational Health and Safety Management System  See our 2018 Material Issue Report which will be available mid 2019 for a full review of the Health and Safety Management System. 

TRAINING AND EDUCATION

404-1 Average hours of training per year per employee by gender, and by employee category Argentina
Manager & Above:  12 hrs 
Supervisor/ Sr Technical/Professionals:  25 hours 
Operators/ General Positions: 96 hours

Brazil
Manager & Above:  35 hrs 
Supervisor/ Sr Technical/Professionals:  10 hours 
                                                                                                                     Operators/ General Positions: 8 hours                                                                                                                                                Chile
All: 33 hours
404-2 Programs for upgrading employee skills and transition assistance programs
An Employee Learning Management System is available to all employees. Main training includes compliance, health and safety, employee development, language courses, and leadership skills. Employees at all levels and in all regions have access to training. All employees go through mandatory employee compliance training at the time of hire, including but not limited to: Code of Conduct and Corporate Governance Policies and Health & Safety Onboarding. Additional training is also held at each site.
404-3 Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews, by gender and by employee categoryAll employees are evaluated through a performance review taking into account the accomplishment of corporate, business unit, area, and individual objectives as applicable. Performance criteria must be determined prior to the start of the performance period. All scorecards used must be forwarded to Corporate HR for record keeping..

DIVERSITY AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY

405-1 Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per employee category according to gender, age group, minority group membership, and other indicators of diversity Executive Committee: 
(Sr. VP and above)
Number of  Members: 10
Gender: M - 9 F-1
Age groups: 30-40: (0) 40-50:(4) Over 50:(6)
Minority Groups: 2 

Board of Directors: 
Number of Board Members: 11
Gender: M - 7 F-4
Age groups: Over 50 (91%)
Minority Groups: 4 

 405-2Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to men by employee category, by significant locations of operation Argentina                                                                         Brazil
Manager & Above: -25%                                        Manager & Above: -15%
Sup./Professional:  +5%                                         Sup./Professional:  +24% 
General Positions:  -3%                                          General Positions:  -17%
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Canada                                                                            Chile
Manager & Above: -31%                                        Manager & Above: -17%
Sup./Professional:  +5%                                         Sup./Professional:  -25% 
General Positions:  -4%                                          General Positions:  23% 

SUB-CATEGORY: HUMAN RIGHTS

NON-DISCRIMINATION

406-1 Total number of incidents of discrimination and corrective actions taken No discrimination incidents registered in the period.

FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION AND COLLECTIVE BARGAINING

407-1 Operations and suppliers identified in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be violated or at significant risk, and measures taken to support these rights None

CHILD LABOR

408-1 Operations and suppliers identified as having significant risk for incidents of child labor, and measures taken to contribute to the effective abolition of child labor None

FORCED OR COMPULSORY LABOR

409-1 Operations and suppliers identified as having significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labor, and measures to contribute to the elimination of all forms of forced or compulsory labor
None

SECURITY PRACTICES

410-1 Percentage of security personnel trained in the organization's human rights policies or procedures that are relevant to operations 100%.

INDIGENOUS RIGHTS

411-1
Total number of incidents of violations involving rights of indigenous peoples and actions taken None

ASSESSMENT

412-1 Total number and percentage of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or impact assessments Our operations have are regularly evaluated from a human rights risk perspective (every 2-3 years). As none are deemed to be a high or significant risk we have not conducted comprehensive, standalone human rights impact assessments. However, many of the site's Environmental and Social Impact Assessments have aspects of human rights within their assessments, which were subsequently incorporated into management plans.

In addition, we are signatories to the World Gold Council, which requires us to adhere to the Conflict Free Gold Standard; as such, we complete an annual, externally assured, report to demonstrate that our operations do not contribute to conflict. Previous years reports are available on our website with the 2018 report being available in mid-2019.
 412-2Total hours of employee training on human rights policies or procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations, including the percentage of employees trained Our human rights training focuses on small targeted groups within Yamana, such as our security and community relations teams.

100% of employees must complete an annual review and signoff on Yamana's Code of Conduct, which includes aspects on human rights.

In addition to annual review and signoff of the company's Code of Conduct 100% of security personnel have received specific human rights training.  
 412-3Total number and percentage of significant investment agreements and contracts that include human rights clauses or that underwent human rights screening All of our investments undergo rigorous due diligence, which, depending on the jurisdiction, typically include various reviews around: environment, health and safety, community relations, labor practices, and other areas of concern which encompass human rights. Many of our operations require suppliers and contractors to signoff on Yamana's code of conduct.

SUB-CATEGORY: SOCIETY

LOCAL COMMUNITIES

413-1 Percentage of operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and development programs 100% of our operations have:
- Community Engagement Plans
- Community Development programs
- Social diagnosis (every 2 years)

We had 109 formal citizen meetings with community stakeholders, where we reached over 1,300 people. Through a total of 71 site visits, we also hosted over 1,650 visitors directly at our mines. These Open Doors programs hosted community members, students, employee family members, press, government officials and others. 

We have active grievance mechanisms in place for our communities to voice their concerns.
413-2 Operations with significant actual and potential negative impacts on local communities None. The majority of our operations are located anywhere from 10s to 100s of KMs from communities. The major impact on these communities is the creation of jobs through direct and indirect employment, as well as the company's direct contribution to social development. Three of our operations are located in close proximity to host communities (Minera Florida in Chile, Chapada and Jacobina in Brazil), where a small number of individuals have encountered some negative impacts related to noise, dust, vibration and increased vehicle traffic. We work directly with these local stakeholder to ensure these nuisances are mitigated or minimized, and when appropriate stakeholders are compensated.

PUBLIC POLICY

415-1 Total value of political contributions by country and recipient/beneficiary None

SUPPLIER ASSESSMENT FOR IMPACTS ON SOCIETY

414-1 Percentage of new suppliers that were screened using criteria for impacts on society 100%. 
All new suppliers are required to sign and comply with Yamana's Code of Conduct. Within the Code of Conduct is a section on Fair Labor Practices, Human Rights and social criteria. For additional information, please see our Code of Conduct, published on the Yamana website. In addition to the Code of Conduct HSEC topics are provided by the local HSEC team as a criteria for evaluation according to the material/service related to the respective bidding.
414-2 Significant actual and potential negative impacts on society in the supply chain and actions taken None observed.

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NON-GAAP INFORMATION

Yamana discloses certain non-GAAP measures including Cash costs per ounce of gold, Cash costs per ounce of silver, Co-product cash costs per ounce of gold, Co-product cash costs per ounce of silver, Co-product cash costs per pound of copper, All-in sustaining costs per ounce of gold, All-in sustaining costs per ounce of silver, All-in sustaining co-product costs per ounce of gold, and All-in sustaining co-product costs per ounce of silver to supplement its Consolidated Financial Statements, which are presented in accordance with IFRS. The term IFRS and generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) are used interchangeably. The Company believes that these measures, together with measures determined in accordance with IFRS, provide investors with an improved ability to evaluate the underlying performance of the Company. Non-GAAP measures do not have any standardized meaning prescribed under IFRS, and therefore they may not be comparable to similar measures employed by other companies. The data is intended to provide additional information and should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for measures of performance prepared in accordance with IFRS.

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