GRI Index

For the period from January 1 - December 31st, 2015



GENERAL STANDARD DISCLOSURES
Standard Disclosure Standard Disclosure Title Comment

STRATEGY AND ANALYSIS

G4-1 CEO Statement See the CSR Report for CEO Statement.
G4-2 Risks and Impacts See Yamana's Management Information Circular the Annual Report and the Annual Information Form.

ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILE

G4-3 Name of the organization Yamana Gold Inc. 
G4-4 Primary brands, products, and services. Gold, Silver, Copper
G4-5 Location of the organization’s headquarters Toronto, Ontario, Canada
G4-6 Number/name of countries where the organization operates Canada, United States, Mexico, Brazil, Chile, Argentina
G4-7 Nature of ownership and legal form Yamana Gold Inc. is a publicly-traded corporation listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange and the New York Stock Exchange under the symbols YRI and AUY, respectively.
G4-8 Markets served  Based in Canada, we are a gold producer engaged in gold mining and related activities including exploration, extraction, processing and reclamation. We have significant precious metal properties and land positions throughout the Americas including in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Canada.

Our Principal Product is gold, with its sale accounting for the majority of revenues. Yamana sells its precious metals into the worldwide commodities market at the spot price, and does not rely solely on one purchaser. We began producing gold-copper concentrate in 2007 at the Chapada mine, which significantly adds to the revenues and cash flows generated from our production. Yamana has contracts with a number of smelters, refineries and copper-trading companies to sell its gold-copper concentrate. 
G4-9 Scale of the organization Total number of Employees:  5440
Total number of Operations: 9 producing mines and 1 core development project
Net Revenues in 2015:$1,824.9M
Gold production in 2015: 1.28M ounces
G4-10 Total Employees Full Time Employee/ Indeterminate Contracts: 
Male:  5917
Female:  523  TOTAL:  5440

Supervisor level: M: 889  F: 89  General Employees:  M: 5028 F: 435

By Region:
Argentina:  Male: 939  - 93% Female: 66 -  6%
Brazil:  Male: 2677  - 90.2% Female:  290  - 9.8%
Canada:  Male: 55 - 49% Female: 57 - 51%
USA:  Male 6 - 75%  Female: 2 - 25%
Chile:  Male: 1811- 95.9% Female: 73- 4%
Mexico:  Male: 429 - 92%  Female: 35 - 8%

%of Contract Workers: 47%

Seasonal Variations: N/A
G4-11  Percentage of total employees covered by collective bargaining agreements 44%
G4-12 Supply Chain Description Yamana has a global supply chain with a host of local, regional, national and international suppliers.
See table below
Country 2015 Contractors 2015 Amount  (Millions USD)
Argentina 78 $67.91
Brasil 2980 $312.00
Chile 189 $200.28
México 68 $32.85
Total 3315 $613.04
G4-13 Reporting changes from previous year Yamana maintains three semi-autonomous operational divisions in Northern Operations, Southern Operations, and Brio Gold Operations which are under common corporate oversight.
Completed an equity financing and streaming deal thereby improving our balance sheet strength significantly. 
G4-14 Precautionary approach / principle Mining can create significant environmental impacts, particularly if not managed adequately. For this reason, Yamana uses a precautionary approach in environmental and operational planning. We apply a hierarchy of environmental control/management when making decisions, with a constant aim to avoid, control, mitigate or offset impacts any and all issues.
G4-15 External charters, principles or initiatives All Yamana operations maintain external certification of:
- ISO 14001
- OHSAS 18000
- International Cyanide Management Code Standards
The company also uses the following guidelines in a non-required capacity:
- The IFC Performance Standards on social and environmental sustainability
- The Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights
G4-16 Memberships At an organization level, we are members of the following organizations:
• The Canadian Chamber of Commerce
• Ontario Mining Association
• Quebec Mining Association (l’Association minière du Québec )
• Canadian Council for the Americas
• International Cyanide Management Code (ICMC)
• Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC)
• World Gold Council
• Canadian Bar Association
This list does not include professional associations such as the Canadian Bar Association or the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants, etc. 

IDENTIFIED MATERIAL ASPECTS AND BOUNDARIES

G4-17 Overview of company entities a. See G4-8
b. All entities included in the organization's consolidated financial statements is covered in the report"
G4-18 Approach and principles for defining report content Stakeholder Inclusiveness: When identifying and defining who our stakeholders are for Yamana, we strongly believe that it is in our best interest to take a view that is as broad and holistic as possible. From the corporate level to the operations, we define stakeholders not only as those who are impacted by (or have an impact on) our company but also those who have a general or specific interest in the company. This report endeavors to provide content that is material to all stakeholders, while also recognizing that some groups of stakeholders will utilize the report more frequently and more thoroughly.
Sustainability Context: The report and this GRI index most prominently features Yamana's specific performance. In some instances, the performance speaks for itself, but using our professional judgment, we have made efforts to contextualize the data where possible and/or where relevant.
Completeness: We feel that the information contained in the report and the GRI provides a very complete overview of the company's sustainability performance. We have not had the report externally assured, but we continue to review the value of external assurance on a year-by-year basis. 
G4-19 Material aspects identified  The CSR  Report looks at the follow material aspects, which were identified as the 'most material' aspects to Yamana with regards to issues of Health, Safety and Sustainability:
-Health & Safety
-Water
-Waste/Tailings Management
-Community Relations/Social License
-Climate Change
-Governance
G4-20 Aspect Boundary within the organization See G4-18 
G4-21 Aspect Boundary outside the organization See G4-18 

STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT

G4-24 List of stakeholder groups engaged by the organization With multiple operations across five operating countries, the list of stakeholders that Yamana engages is far too large to list in terms of specifics. The following is an overview of the types of stakeholder groups we engage with on a regular basis:
- Employees and employee families
- Indigenous communities and traditional leaders
- Local citizens (as individuals, through multiple different engagement venues)
- Local municipalities and leaders
- Local citizens groups
- Civil society groups (NGOs)
- Religious and faith-based organizations
- Municipal, Regional and National authorities and planners
- Host governments
- Industry associations
- Academia
- Suppliers and contractors
- Investors and investment research organizations 
G4-25 Basis for identification and selection of stakeholders We take an inclusive approach to identifying stakeholders at Yamana. From the corporate level to the operations, we define stakeholders not only as those who are impacted by (or have an impact on) our company but also those who have a general or specific interest in the company. While each operation maintains a unique, culturally-specific approach to stakeholder engagement, we ensure that appropriate and inclusive stakeholder mapping process is always at the foundation of an engagement strategy.
G4-26 Organization’s approach to stakeholder engagement Each operation maintains a unique approach to stakeholder engagement. The effort is to engage all stakeholders who are impacted by or interested in the operation, no only authorities and leaders. Our engagement is guided by internal policies and standards around community and stakeholder engagement, specially, our Social Responsibility Policy and our Standard for Communication with Stakeholders.
At the core of our approach to engagement is our belief that transparent, honest and meaningful dialogue with communities is central to establishing and maintaining a social license to operate, We also maintain active grievance mechanisms to ensure that there are multiple channels of dialogue available to communities and external stakeholders to express their concerns. 
G4-27 Key topics and concerns raised through stakeholder engagement The key topics and concerns for our operations vary by operation and by country. The most common issues as they related to feedback through stakeholder engagement processes are as follows:
- Jobs
- Contracts and local procurement
- Concerns around noise, dust and/or vibration (common, but also very  location specific)
- General environmental concerns (e.g. impacts water quality or quantity)

REPORT PROFILE

G4-28 Reporting period 2015 Year
G4-29 Most recent report 2014
G4-30 Reporting cycle Annual
G4-31 Contact point Ross Gallinger, Senior Vice President, Health, Safety & Sustainable Development (Ross.Gallinger@Yamana.com
G4-32 In accordance option This report has been completed in accordance with the GRI G4 Guidelines - Comprehensive.
G4-33 External assurance This report is not externally assured. 

GOVERNANCE

G4-34 Governance structure  Our board and its committees are highly engaged, and committed to strong stewardship and our long-term success. For a current statement of Corporate Governance Practices, please refer to the most current Yamana Management Informational Circular on Sedar (www.sedar.com).

Committees responsible for decision-making on economic, environmental and social impacts are:
1) Audit Committee
2) Compensation Committee
3) Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee
4) Sustainability Committee
G4-35 Process for delegating authority There are issue-specific mechanisms for communication, but generally speaking, operations (General Managers) report to Country Managers, Regional SVPs and/or functional SVPs at the corporate office (e.g. SVP Health, Safety & Sustainable Development), depending on the issue. 
G4-36 Executive-level position(s) with responsibility for sustainability Appointed Executive-Level Positions:
Peter Marrone - Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Charles B. Main - Executive Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer
Darcy Marud - Executive Vice President, Enterprise Strategy
Greg McKnight - Executive Vice President, Business Development
G4-37 Processes for consultation between stakeholders and the highest governance body For a current statement of Corporate Governance Practices, please refer to the most current Yamana Management Informational Circular on Sedar (www.sedar.com).
G4-38 Composition of the highest governance body  See Yamana's Management Information Circular.
G4-39 Board Chair as executive officer Our Chairman is Peter Marrone, who founded Yamana Gold in 2003 and also serves as CEO. A lead director is in place given that the roles of Chairman and Chief Executive Officer are combined, and we believe that the combined position does not detract from the effective functioning of the board. Our position is unique because our Chairman and CEO is also the founder of the company. The board believes that the passion, drive and leadership brought to bear by our founder have been instrumental in Yamana's success to date. 
G4-40 Nomination and selection processes for the highest governance body and its committees See Yamana's Management Information Circular.
G4-41 Managing conflicts of interest The board takes steps to ensure that our directors, executives and employees use sound judgment and understand our code of conduct, the rules of reporting conflicts of interest, and the need to receive direction from the Lead Director and the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) about any potential conflicts of interest. 
G4-42 Development, approval, and updating of the organization’s purpose,  strategies, policies, etc. Yamana's HSEC team, lead by a Senior Vice President of Health, Safety and Sustainable Development, is responsible for developing strategy and policies, as well as driving discussions of any mission/vision statements.
While the team builds the builds the strategy, etc. in a collaborative manner with its operations, any new developments or material changes then go through consultation processes through site leaders (general managers), country managers, the senior executive team and ultimately the Board of Directors.
G4-43 Highest governance body’s sustainability knowledge  The highest governing body within the organization is the Board of Directors. The Board maintains a sustainability sub-committee, which meets every time the board meetings and is designed specifically to review issues from the corporate office to the field. Yamana's Senior Vice-President of Health, Safety and Sustainable Development is responsible for the communication from the management team to the Board of Directors on these issues, as well as advancing their knowledge. 
G4-44 Evaluation of the highest governance body’s performance on sustainability The Board of Directors is ultimately responsible for the management of sustainability at Yamana. Specifically, the Board's roles and responsibilities are:
- Governing the organization by establishing broad policies and objectives;
- Selecting, appointing, supporting and reviewing the performance of the chief executive;
- Ensuring the availability of adequate financial resources;
- Approving annual budgets;
- Accounting to the stakeholders for the organization's performance;
- Setting the salaries and compensation of company management;

The Board of Directors, including the Sustainability Committee receives and communicates through the following channels:
- Performance and issues are communicated across all these groups on a monthly basis (monthly report)
- Sustainability strategy is reviewed annually across all these groups as well as mine site GMs
-Major risks are review as well by the risk team, which reports to the Audit Committee (3 times a year).

Stakeholder input is received by the Board of Directors at the Annual AGM, through any grievance or hotline mechanisms. The Senior Management Group interacts more regularly with external stakeholders through investor calls, socially responsible investor calls, conferences and meeting requests from outside organizations.
G4-45   See G4-44
G4-46 Reviewing the effectiveness of the organization’s risk management The Senior Management Group and Board of Directors reviews performance on a monthly basis. Both groups also review annual performance and all management (from Corporate office to Operations managers) have a component of their long term and short term incentive programs linked to sustainability performance - see the Annual Management Circular for specific details.
G4-47 Frequency of the sustainability review See G4-44 and G4-46
G4-48 Reviews and approval of sustainability report  See G4-44 and G4-46
G4-49 Communicating critical concerns Yamana maintains multiple communication channels for communicating critical concerns to its senior executive team and board of directors, depending on the nature and severity of the concern.

At the center of our risk/incident control approach is the company's Risk Department (led by a Vice President of Risk Management). Upon review of a risk, concern or incident, the Risk function involves other relevant departments (Legal, HR, Internal Audit, Security, etc.) and may engage with external auditors, where necessary, to better evaluate a situation. For critical situations, senior management are notified immediately in the process.
G4-50 Nature and total number of critical concerns There is no specific technical threshold within Yamana for communicating critical concerns to senior management. While we track each and every incident, we do not have specific data to indicate a precise number of 'critical concerns'. Rather, we take a precautionary approach, as senior management are typically advised of even non-critical risks, concerns or incidents.
G4-51 Remuneration policies Total Compensation at Yamana is comprised of a number of components, each contributing to a total package. Compensation programs include: base salary, annual incentive awards, long term incentive awards (Restricted Share Units or Deferred Cash) and any special bonuses, allowances and perquisites:
- An RSU is a grant of a value of company stock, but company stock is not issued at the time of grant.  Once the vesting period is completed, the stock is issued to the employee.
- Deferred Cash is the grant of a cash award that has a vesting schedule.  Once the vesting schedule is met, the cash award is issued to the employee.
- All components of the compensation package are analyzed on an annual basis to ensure it is competitive to the market.  The market is defined by companies that are similar to Yamana Gold and also companies with whom we compete for talent.
- Yamana Gold has adopted the principle of ‘pay for performance’ which states that average performance, results in average compensation while above average performance, results in above average compensation.

Benefits
Yamana Gold provides employees with market competitive benefits.  Although the benefits differ by geography, they are consistent with local market practices and may include a variety of components.
Paid Time Off
Yamana Gold provides employees with time off for vacation and holidays.  The entitlement varies based on local market practices.
Recognition
Yamana Gold provides employees with locally based reward and recognition opportunities to motivate and engage employees.
Development
Yamana Gold provides employees with training and development opportunities to assist with career progression and advancement.  Yamana Gold places an importance on promoting employees from within the company, where possible and in accordance to the  Corporate Human Resources Training and Development Programs and Policies.
Work Environment
Yamana Gold provides employees the flexibility to manage their personal obligations.
G4-52 Process for determining remuneration The process for determining remuneration is led by the Human Resources department. Remuneration consultants are not directly involved in the process. Market surveys of external competitiveness and best practices are considered during this process.
G4-53 Stakeholders’ views and remuneration  Through the establishment of a  remuneration total reward policy, available upon request, taking into account  competitive market best practices and internal equity.
G4-54 Ratio of highest-paid to median compensation 55:1
G4-55 Ratio of percentage increase in compensation for CEO 1%

ETHICS AND INTEGRITY

G4-56 Values, principles, standards and norms of behavior The core values of Yamana are:
-Safe Work Environment,
-Entrepreneurial Spirit,
-Operational Excellence,
-Continuous Improvement,
Transparency,
Ethical Attitude,
Responsive to Local, Communities,
Responsibility,
Respect for the Environment, and
Integrity.

Yamana Gold is committed to the highest standards of corporate governance practices. The Company and the Board of Directors recognize the importance of corporate governance to the effective management of the Company and to the protection of its employees and shareholders.
Yamana's approach to significant issues of corporate governance is designed with a view to ensuring that the business and affairs of the Company are effectively managed so as to enhance shareholder value. For a current statement of Corporate Governance Practices, please refer to the most current Yamana Management Information Circular available on Sedar at www.sedar.com.
Code of conduct: http://www.yamana.com/English/company/ethics-and-governance/default.aspx
G4-57 Mechanisms for seeking advice on ethical and lawful behavior Internal: Yamana maintains an ethics hotline that can be accessed by phone and by computer.
External: Each operation maintains an active grievance mechanism that is accessible through a range of options (context specific). See SO 10 for more details
G4-58 Mechanisms for reporting concerns about unethical or unlawful behavior Yamana maintains an internal ethics / whistleblower hotline. 

SPECIFIC STANDARD DISCLOSURES

Standard Disclosure Standard Disclosure Title Comment

ECONOMIC

ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-EC1 Direct economic value generated and distributed See table below

2015 Summary of Corporate Investments, Donations, Taxes and Royalties
In USD

Brazil Argentina Chile Toronto Mexico Total
Direct Community Investments $150,705 $2,256,732 $19,354 $- $11,377 $2,438,169
Donations & Sponsorship $1,120,896 $27,969 $444,619 $1,297,745 $59,373 $2,950,602
Tax & Royalty Payments to Local Government $46,811,089 $41,687,413 $51,261,468 $5,242,792 $3,160,696 $148,163,457
G4-EC2 Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization's activities due to climate change See the climate change section of our CSR Report.
G4-EC3 Coverage of the organization's defined benefit plan obligations All full-time, permanent employees are eligible for a Pension Plan. Yamana's Pension Plan helps employees to reach their income goals for retirement. Yamana makes defined contributions to the plan and employees are also able to make voluntary contributions. The plan is available in all regions and is designed to complement local government social security systems. The Company's contributions are based on the employee's gross annual base salary and in accordance with their years of service.  Varies by region and by plan provider. Options are available for low, medium and high risk portfolios and employees have the ability to transition to different funds and manage their investment personally.
G4-EC4 Financial assistance received from government We do not yet have this data for 2015. To be reported fully in 2016 report.

MARKET PRESENCE

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-EC5 Ratios of standard entry level wage by gender compared to local minimum wage at significant locations of operation Based on the compliance with local legislation and the application of a competitive compensation policy all regions compensate their employees, without gender distinction, above the minimum wage rules. We do not measure exact ratios.
G4-EC6 Proportion of senior management hired from the local community at significant locations of operation Argentina - 39% of Sr. Management hired from Local Community.
Brazil - Approximately 100% of Sr. Management are nationals. 0% of Sr. Management hired from Local Community.
Canada and USA - 98% of Sr. Management are nationals
Chile - 100 % of Sr. Management hired are nationals
Mexico - 70% of Sr. Management hired are nationals

We don't have precise numbers for the % of locals Sr. managers for these last three locations.

"Sr. Managers" includes any employee in a position of Sr. leadership. At Yamana, this includes any employee at superintendent level or above. The term "local" is defined by the towns where our operations are located. Preference is given to the town and surrounding towns located near the mine. "Significant Location of Operation" is defined as units where we operate.

INDIRECT ECONOMIC IMPACTS

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-DMA (Aspect - specific) Generic Disclosures on Management Approach - Aspect Specific See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-EC7 Development and impact of infrastructure investments and services supported See table below
Jacobina Gualcamayo Minera Florida
$63,910.00 $3,120,980.00 $6,584.00
Road improvement and maintenance Improvements to municipal plaza Gualcamayo's contribution to infrastructure goes through a government contribution agreement. The contributions are disbursed by the municipal governments on a range of projects. Since 2009, over $19 M has gone into local municipalities through this agreement. Projects:
- Improvement of potable water system
- Local health clinic repairs
- Local school repairs
- Construction/repair of playgrounds
- Construction of recycling facility
- Municipal office repair
- Construction of micro reservoir"
Refer to G4-EC1 for an overview of all community investment
G4-EC8 Significant indirect economic impacts, including the extent of impacts Our operations have a range of direct and indirect impacts on the regions and the communities where they operate. Specifically in the areas of local business development and local economic development.

Local Business Development: Beyond the direct jobs created by the mine and suppliers of our operations, local business experience the benefits of local economic growth through increased wages and spending capacities, particularly of families who benefit from direct wages from the operations.

Local Economic Development: Our operations provide direct contributions towards local economic development. For more details see our CSR Reports and indicators EC1, EC7 and SO1

Community Investment Spending: In 2015, Yamana Gold contributed $5.39 million dollars to local communities.


Direct Community Investments:  $ 2,438,169

Donations & Sponsorship:  $  2,950,602

Tax & Royalty Payments to Local Government:  $  148,163,457 

PROCUREMENT PRACTICES

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-DMA (Aspect - specific) Generic Disclosures on Management Approach - Aspect Specific See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-EC9 Proportion of spending on local suppliers at significant locations of operation Local and regional supply chains are an important way for our company to add direct and indirect value to the our host communities and host governments.

- 95% of all of our purchasing was done within host countries in 2015.

- 56% of our all purchasing was regional (includes local); and 

-17% was local

We define regional as within the state/province of operation and we definite local as our neighboring/host communities, which is defined uniquely by each operation. In some instances, our 'local' communities are those within 5-25km and in other instances, our 'local' communities are as far away as 100km.

ENVIRONMENTAL

MATERIALS

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-EN1 Materials used by weight or volume See tables below for a complete overview of materials, waste and disposal methods.



Mercedes Pilar
Wastewater - Volume / Local of Discharged Public System of Wastewater Collection (m³) 0.00 0.00
Removed by truck (m³) 0.00 0.00
River, lake, other water bodies (m³) 11,952,676.00 21,188.66
Soil (m³) 31,719.00 0.00
Total Wastewater 11,984,395.00 21,188.66
The information for this indicator is currently only available for two of our operations.



Mercedes Chapada Pilar Jacobina Gualcamayo El Peñon Florida Total
Non mineral solid waste - by Destination Coprocessing (t) 0.00 524.87 10.07 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 534.94
DAM (t) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Incineration (t) 0.00 158.24 14,450.06 59.66 1,941.42 0.00 0.00 16,609.38
Local Storage (Temporary Waste Storage Buildings) (t) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Recovery (t) 0.00 0.00 28.73 0.00 0.00 515.47 0.00 544.20
Recycling (t) 0.00 843.14 1,442.03 369.86 387.53 0.00 0.00 3,042.56
Re-refining (t) 0.00 242.98 22.89 43.26 0.00 0.00 0.00 309.13
Reuse (t) 0.00 0.00 1,470.00 76.58 0.00 0.00 318,360.00 319,906.58
Sanitary Landfill (t) 799,349.00 174.97 3,808.13 187.09 660.19 0.00 1,016,605.00 1,820,784.38
Waste Dump (t) 0.00 44.15 0.00 0.00 0.00 2,373.16 0.00 2,417.31
Total Solid Waste (t) 799,349.00 1,988.35 21,231.91 736.45 2,989.14 2,888.63 1,334,965.00 2,164,148.48
This information is not tracked for Fazenda Brasileiro.
G4-EN2 Percentage of materials used that are recycled input materials N/A

ENERGY

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach Through our materiality process, Climate Change identified as one of most material issues to Yamana and its stakeholders. This issue encompasses both energy and emissions. For a full outline of our disclosure on management approach for this issue can be viewed in our CSR Report.
G4-DMA (Aspect - specific) Generic Disclosures on Management Approach - Aspect Specific See above indicator.
G4-EN3 Energy consumption within the organization See table below
Site Diesel (liters) Electricty (MWh)
Chapada 32,980,425 276,506
Jacobina 3,488,777 80,908
Gualcamayo 15,050,597 41,664
El Peñon 10,823,554 106,258
Florida 2,794,293 93,799
Mercedes 2,706,066 73,429
Fazenda Brasileiro 3,263,687 67,754
Pilar 3,668,546 55,291
Total 74,775,945 795,609
G4-EN4 Energy consumption outside of the organization We do not track this as it is not a material number for the organization.
G4-EN5 Energy intensity We do not track this as it is not a material number for the organization.
G4-EN6 Reduction of energy consumption Each site develops its own energy reduction program. The site initiatives in 2015 included:
- Engine replacement standard for high performance engines.
- Replacement of water main pumps for higher-yielding pumps.
- Electrical Structural Reform to replace undersized and overloaded circuits.
- Use of additives in the fuel to reduce engine wear and fuel consumption.
- Switch to high efficiency lighting
- Changes to air compression and ventilation systems
Site MWh
Mercedes 614
Chapada 39,062
Fazenda 502
Pilar 302
Jacobina Not calculated
Gualcamayo 4,730
El Peñon 548
Florida 15
Total 45,774
G4-EN7 Reductions in energy requirements of products and services N/A

WATER

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach Why is Water a Material Issue for Yamana?
Water is considered by many as the world’s most precious commodity. While an integral part of the mining process, we also recognize that first and foremost, it is essential to countries and the communities we operate in, and one of the great concerns of communities, government and civil society alike. In terms of the potential for impacts, it is always a material issue for our stakeholders. Given the water intensive nature of mining and specifically processing ore and level of materiality of this issue amongst many of our stakeholder groups, water was clearly one of most material issues for this report.

How do we Manage Water at Yamana?
We believe that the mining industry needs to play a significant role in responsibly managing both water quality and water quantity issues in areas where it operates. Although only two of our operations have any type of discharge to the environment, and most of operations draw the bulk of their water needs from within the mine and/or rainfall, we nevertheless understand the need to manage this issue closely.

Our operations work continuously to minimize their freshwater consumption and use as much recycled water as possible. In 2013, we improved our system of flow meters at sites across our portfolio of our operations to enhance our understanding of each site’s water balance. Each site sets targets related to freshwater consumption and recycling.
G4-EN8 Total water withdrawal by source See table below




Mercedes Chapada Fazenda Pilar Jacobina Gualcamayo El Peñon Florida Total
Fresh Water Consumption - by Source
Total Water from Public Supply








Total Water Withdrawal from Mine 993,639.00 5,407,224.00
2,545,590.04

3,744,351.76
12,690,804.80
Total Water Withdrawal from Rivers
1,480,584.00
432,911.55 120,803.00

641,048.00
2,034,298.55
Total Water Withdrawal from Underground Wells
80,100.20 739,872.00 5,365.21
1,116,789.30 6,693,476.66
8,635,603.37
Total Water 993,639.00 6,967,908.20 739,872.00 3,046,694.79 120,803.00 1,116,789.30 10,523,027.46 641,048.00 24,149,781.75
G4-EN9 Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal of water There are no water sources significantly affected by our operations.
G4-EN10 Percentage and total volume of water recycled and reused See table below



Mercedes Chapada Fazenda Pilar Jacobina Gualcamayo El Peñon Florida Total
Recycled and Reused Water Total Water Withdrawl 993,639.00 6,967,908.20 739,872.00 3,046,694.79 120,803.00 1,116,789.30 10,523,027.46 641,048.00 24,149,781.75
Total Water Recycled and Reused 343,781.00 34,899,711.30 521,754.48 1,282,981.10 1,936,667.09 6,728,508.39 4,705,753.00 1,890,497.55 52,309,653.91
% of Total Water Use
35% 501% 71% 42% 1603% 602% 45% 295%
Total Water Use








76,459,435.66
% recycled








68%

BIODIVERSITY

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-DMA (Aspect - specific) Generic Disclosures on Management Approach - Aspect Specific See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-MM1 Amount of land (owned or leased, and managed for production activities or extractive use) disturbed or rehabilitated We do not have this yet calculated for all of our operations, but intend to for the following year's report.
Mercedes Chapada Gualcamayo Minera
Florida
Mine Site Total Area (ha) 201.94 4561.51 717.00 2543.80
Total Impacted Area (ha) 119.63 146.02 11.63 77.00
Total Recovered Area (ha) - 102.00 - -
G4-MM2 The number and percentage of total sites identified as requiring biodiversity management plans according to stated criteria, and the number (percentage) of those sites with plans in place Three of our operations are located near areas of high biodiversity value. Chapada, Jacobina and Pilar in Brazil are all located adjacent to large permanent preservation areas.

These areas are generally determined as a sensitive areas, although our assessments identify no significant impact on overall biodiversity.

The general aspects of impacts or potential impacts that we have identified and continue mitigate or manage are as follows:
-Increased levels of noises
-Potential for contamination of water or soil risk from accidental spills
- Changes in local water availability
- Changing the quality of water resources for generation of Acid Drainage
- Changing the natural landscape or vegetation cover 
G4-EN11 Operational sites owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas See MM2
G4-EN12 Description of significant impacts of activities, products, and services on biodiversity in protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas See MM2
G4-EN13 Habitats protected or restored Restored Habitat:
Florida - 45.7 ha
Jacobina - 80 ha
Pilar - 410 ha
Chapada - 100 ha
Fazenda - 61 ha (restored) 243 ha (protected)
G4-EN14 Total number of IUCN Red List species and national conservation list species with habitats in areas affected by operations, by level of extinction risk See table below

IUCN Red List Species

Mercedes Chapada Fazenda Pilar Jacobina Gualcamayo El Peñon Florida
Critically endangered
Endangered 1
Vulnerable 3 8 3 3
Near threatened 3 3 2
Least concern 5

EMISSIONS

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach Why are Emissions and Climate Change Material Issues for Yamana?
Climate change presents very real, immediate physical risk to the mining industry. With operations located in challenging geographical jurisdictions and operational processes that are highly subject to issues of water, weather and energy, issues climate change have emerged the forefront of mine planning and operational issues for Yamana over the past several years.

Our company’s response to climate change is also an issue of primary concern amongst particular stakeholder groups, such as social responsible investing (SRI) community and others. Our operations have been adjusting mine development and operations accordingly as rules, regulations and weather patterns for years, as we continue to evolve our understanding of the issue. But increasingly, we are asked to discuss our climate change strategy in more depth. For this reason, we have chosen climate change as one of our key material issues for discussion in our Annual CSR Report

How do we Manage Emissions and Climate Change at Yamana?
At Yamana, we tackle climate change through a two-pronged strategy: Adaption and energy efficiency. 

Adaptation: with the potential for extreme weather events, we review the risks to our operations and modify our facilities as required. Tailings management is a good example of this, where we constantly review both planning (new dams or additions to existing facilities) and operational aspects by re-evaluate the risks and mitigation measures of changing weather patterns and effects of extreme storm events to ensure our tailings management is robust. This same approach to planning is incorporated into a range of environmental and general mine operations.

Energy Efficiency: Our energy efficiency programs are focused on minimizing the use of fossil fuels and have the added benefit of reducing our carbon footprint.  However, with our aging operations going deeper and haulage routes increasing, we continue to need to be vigilant in energy/carbon management to try to maintain a consistent carbon footprint.
G4-DMA (Aspect - specific) Generic Disclosures on Management Approach - Aspect Specific
G4-EN15 Direct greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (Scope 1) See table below

GHG Emissions
Site tCO2e (Scope 1)
Chapada 86,408.71
Jacobina 9,140.59
Gualcamayo 38,680.03
El Peñon 29,873.01
Florida 7,712.25
Mercedes 7,468.74
Fazenda Brasileiro 8,550.86
Pilar 9,334.43
Total 197,168.63
G4-EN16 Energy indirect greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (Scope 2) See table below

GHG Emissions
Site tCO2e (Scope 2)
Chapada 36,985.43
Jacobina 10,822.22
Gualcamayo 21,805.65
El Peñon 83,944.19
Florida 33,767.64
Mercedes 36,707.16
Fazenda Brasileiro 9,062.71
Pilar 12,743.13
Total 245,838.12
G4-EN17 Other indirect greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (Scope 3) We do not yet capture scope 3 in our reporting.
G4-EN18 Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity See table below

Site Scope 1: tCO2/kton Scope 2: tCo2/kton
Chapada 1.30 1.86
Jacobina 5.01 7.14
Gualcamayo 0.56 2.89
El Peñon 7.23 64.28
Florida 5.43 18.18
Mercedes 9.26 51.45
Fazenda Brasileiro 3.18 7.74
Pilar 6.15 11.85
G4-EN19 Reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions See EN6 for more details on energy reduction initiatives.
Site tC02
Mercedes 423
Chapada 26,935
Fazenda 346
Pilar 208
Jacobina Not calculated
Gualcamayo 3,262
El Peñon 378
Florida 10
Total 31,564
Those savings represent approximately 121 million miles of driving by an average passenger car.
G4-EN20 Emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODS) 0
G4-EN21 NOX, SOX, and other significant air emissions See table below


Chapada Pilar Florida
NOx kg 926,967.83 22,43 kg/h -
SOx kg 32,967.49 1,403e-6 mg/Nm³ -
Persistent organic pollutants (POP) kg - 0 -
Volatile organic compounds (VOC) kg - 0 -
Hazardous air pollutants (HAP) kg - 0 -
Particular matter (PM) kg 26,111.76 6.015E-08 17,500.00

EFFLUENTS AND WASTE

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach Why are Waste/Tailings a Material Issue for Yamana?
Mine waste, specifically tailings, are both an environmental and human health concern in mining jurisdictions throughout the world. Although statistically, the likelihood of having any sort of tailings incident is very low, the consequences can be significant, as the world witnessed with the Bento Rodriguez tailings dam failure in Nov. 2015.

How we manage our tailings has always been a material issue for our host communities and host countries, and just about all of our stakeholders from a local to international level, making it an obvious choice as a material topic for our annual CSR Report.

How do we Manage Tailings at Yamana?
All Yamana Tailing Storage Facilities (TSFs) are subject to a rigorous system of risk management, called SYGBAR, built on a 6-point management system of:
- Standards for Design and construction + use of design review
- Constant TSF monitoring and site-specific KPI development and performance management.
- Periodic safety inspections
- Documentation and periodic reports
- Training and continuous improvement
- Emergency response plans with dam failure analysis

Yamana has a senior level, dedicated corporate manager whose sole responsibility is the maintenance of SYGBAR, which means the active review of Tailings Management to ensure safety and integrity of facilities. This includes regular reporting (monthly) to senior management with progress reports on key issues and a zero tolerance level for medium and high-level risks.

All Yamana TSFs have Emergency Response Plans (ERP). ERPs are built around worst case scenarios (including dam failures) and include procedures for
- The protection of personnel
- Notification of emergency services, neighboring communities and resource management agencies
- Longer term remediation actions

The General Manager for each operation is responsible for the ERP, which is tested through both desktop and live scenario training on a regular basis. In 2016, Yamana will review and test all the operational ERPs, including reviews with external stakeholders.
G4-EN22 Total water discharge by quality and destination See table below



Mercedes Pilar
Water Discharege (by volume and location) Public System of Wastewater Collection (m³) 0.00 0.00
Removed by truck (m³) 0.00 0.00
River, lake, other water bodies (m³) 11,952,676.00 21,188.66
Soil (m³) 31,719.00 0.00
Total Wastewater 11,984,395.00 21,188.66
Only two of our operations have a discharge.
G4-EN23 Total weight of waste by type and disposal method See table below



Mercedes Chapada Pilar Jacobina Gualcamayo El Peñon Florida Total
Non mineral solid waste - by Destination Coprocessing (t) 0.00 524.87 10.07 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 534.94
DAM (t) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Incineration (t) 0.00 158.24 14,450.06 59.66 1,941.42 0.00 0.00 16,609.38
Local Storage (Temporary Waste Storage Buildings) (t) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Recovery (t) 0.00 0.00 28.73 0.00 0.00 515.47 0.00 544.20
Recycling (t) 0.00 843.14 1,442.03 369.86 387.53 0.00 0.00 3,042.56
Re-refining (t) 0.00 242.98 22.89 43.26 0.00 0.00 0.00 309.13
Reuse (t) 0.00 0.00 1,470.00 76.58 0.00 0.00 318,360.00 319,906.58
Sanitary Landfill (t) 799,349.00 174.97 3,808.13 187.09 660.19 0.00 1,016,605.00 1,820,784.38
Waste Dump (t) 0.00 44.15 0.00 0.00 0.00 2,373.16 0.00 2,417.31
Total Solid Waste t 799,349.00 1,988.35 21,231.91 736.45 2,989.14 2,888.63 1,334,965.00 2,164,148.48
This information is not tracked for Fazenda Brasileiro.
G4-EN24 Total number and volume of significant spills See table below


Mercedes Chapada Fazenda Brasiliero Pilar Jacobina Gualcamayo El Peñon Minera Florida
Number and Volume of Spills liters + Qualitative Discription 400 L cyanide solution (not concentrate) in the processing plant.
6 L oil in the mine
6 L oil in a construction area
These (level 1) spills were contained with no measurable impact to the environment.
7 minor spills of lube oil totalling 3126 litres, in the mine, plant and maintenance areas.
These (level 1) spills were contained with no measurable impact to the environment.
None Two events of 2500L and 5000 L of tailings being pumped to TSF, outside the processing plant, which was captured by ponds.
50L of lube oil in maintenance workshop. leaking 50 L OLUC the ground, causing no impact on areas outside the site.
These (level 1) spills was contained with no measurable impact to the environment.
None None None 20 L hydrocarbon within processing plant.
3 minor spills of approximately 200L total of tailings.
These (level 1) spills was contained with no measurable impact to the environment.
G4-MM3 Total amount of overburden, rock, tailings, and sludges and their associated risks See table below



Mercedes Chapada Fazenda Brasiliero Pilar Jacobina Gualcamayo El Peñon Florida Total
Mineral Solid Waste Total Generated Tailings (t) 880,618.00 18,247,588.04 1,564,939.48 0.00 2,005,103.00 0.00 1,418,130.00 1,857,010.55 25,973,389.07
Total Generated Waste Rocks (t) 181,895.00 41,599,689.87 1,625,274.00 423,434.00 465,265.53 25,414,000.00 2,413,787.00 561,870.90 72,685,216.30
G4-EN25 Weight of transported, imported, exported, or treated waste deemed hazardous under the terms of the Basel Convention Annex I, II, III, and VIII, and percentage of transported waste shipped internationally See table below



Mercedes Chapada Fazenda Pilar Jacobina Gualcamayo El Peñon Florida Total
Non Mineral Solid Waste - by Type Hazardous Waste (t) 2,279,212. 472.75 66.24 18,481.59 0.00 1,941.42 419.42
2,300,593.42
Non-Hazardous Waste (t) 0.00 1,449.77 697.10 6,780.62 596.04 1,047.72 1,978.43
12,549.68
Total Solid Waste t 2,279,212.00 1,922.52 763.34 25,262.21 596.04 2,989.14 2,397.85 1,334,965.00 3,648,108.10
G4-EN26 Identity, size, protected status, and biodiversity value of water bodies and related habitats significantly affected by the organization's discharges of water and runoff None

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach N/A
G4-EN27 Extent of impact mitigation of environmental impacts of products and services N/A
G4-EN28 Percentage of products sold and their packaging materials that are reclaimed by category N/A

COMPLIANCE

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach Through our materiality process, Governance was identified as one of most material issues to Yamana and its stakeholders. See our CSR Report for a full overview of our approach to governance.
G4-EN29 Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations Yamana received no fines in 2015.

Our Minera Florida operation in Chile receive a number of non-material environmentally-related non-compliances, which are still under review / discussion with the government and will be decided upon in 2016. 

TRANSPORT

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-EN30 Significant environmental impacts of transporting products and other goods and materials for the organization's operations, and transporting members of the workforce N/A

OVERALL

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-EN31 Total environmental protection expenditures and investments by type See table below
Mercedes Chapada Fazenda Pilar Jacobina Gualcamayo El Peñon Florida Total
[EN31] Total environmental protection expenditures and investments by type Waste disposal, emissions treatment, and remediation costs $ $ 259 744 $124,333.00 $86,264.39 $167,475.91 $124,466.70 $11,474,617.00 $28,745,579.09 $115,476.44 $40,838,212.53

SUPPLIER ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-DMA (Aspect - specific) Generic Disclosures on Management Approach - Aspect Specific See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-EN32 Percentage of new suppliers that were screened using environmental criteria None
G4-EN33 Significant actual and potential negative environmental impacts in the supply chain and actions taken We currently do not collect data on this indicator.

ENVIRONMENTAL GRIEVANCE MECHANISMS

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-EN34 Number of grievances about environmental impacts filed, addressed, and resolved through formal grievance mechanisms None

SOCIAL

SUB-CATEGORY: LABOR PRACTICES AND DECENT WORK

EMPLOYMENT

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-DMA (Aspect - specific) Generic Disclosures on Management Approach - Aspect Specific See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-MM4 Number of strikes and lock-outs exceeding one week's duration, by country None
G4-LA1 Total number and rates of new employee hires and employee turnover by age group, gender and region See table below
Argentina Brazil Canada/USA Chile Mexico
  • New HiresMF
  • < 20:00
  • 21 - 30:270
  • 31 - 40:375
  • 41 - 50:204
  • > 51:132
  • New HiresMF
  • < 20:4459
  • 21 - 30:36694
  • 31 - 40:25420
  • 41 - 50:712
  • > 51:160
  • New HiresMF
  • < 20:00
  • 21 - 30:02
  • 31 - 40:810
  • 41 - 50:61
  • > 51:01
  • New Hires MF
  • < 20:00
  • 21 - 30:53
  • 31 - 40:852
  • 41 - 50:200
  • > 51:08
  • New HiresMF
  • 21 - 29:10
  • 30 - 39:132
  • 40 - 49:111
  • > 50:1
  • TerminationsMF
  • < 20:40
  • 21 - 30:448
  • 31 - 40:755
  • 41 - 50:263
  • > 51:150
  • TerminationsMF
  • < 20:826
  • 21 - 30:12636
  • 31 - 40:885
  • 41 - 50:281
  • > 51:60
  • TerminationMF
  • < 20:00
  • 21 - 30:01
  • 31 - 40:610
  • 41 - 50:35
  • > 51:10
  • TerminationsMF
  • 19811
  • TerminationsMF
  • 21 - 30:32
  • 31 - 40:21
  • 41 - 50:00
  • > 51:00
G4-LA2 Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees, by significant locations of operation Benefits provided to full time employees include:
- life insurance,
- short and long-term disability coverage,
- healthcare (including such things as medical, dental, vision, hospital and pharmaceutical, etc.).

Each operation designs its benefit plans in accordance with the needs of their employees and in line with local market best practices. 
G4-LA3 Return to work and retention rates after parental leave, by gender

Parental leave is available to all employees.
Male: 298
Female: 42

Anticipate 100% return to work

LABOR/MANAGEMENT RELATIONS

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-LA4 Minimum notice periods regarding operational changes, including whether these are specified in collective agreements As a general practice the company notice significant changes with an advance of 2 to 8 weeks.

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach Why is Health & Safety a Material Issue for Yamana?
Over the past number of decades, the global mining industry has made giant strides forward in the protection its work force. As an example, the Mining Association of Canada states that between 1998 and 2010, fatal injuries in the Canadian mining sector falling fell from 47.1 per 100,000 employees to 9.3 per 100,000 employees . But significant hazards still exist - ranging from heavy equipment and rock falls to potential chemical exposure and risks as common as light vehicle traffic or slips, trips and falls. We have dedicated health and safety professionals, integrated throughout the work force, from supervisors to frontline operators in order to help identify and mitigate those risks. We view health and safety as a 24/7 job that is the responsibility of every employee.

In 2015, we had one fatality at Yamana, at a Jacobina mine in Brazil, when a contractor received a fatal shock from a submerged, undetected electrical wire. And despite a relatively positive year statically, we can never claim to have successful year when people are injured or killed on the job, regardless of improvements. Over the years, we have always maintained that our employees have been, and will continue to be our most important stakeholders, and ultimately, this is the reason why we have identified Health and Safety to be a material issue in our 2015 Annual CSR Report.

How do we Manage H&S at Yamana?
As one of our ten Core Principles, we believe that our first responsibility at Yamana is the identification and mitigation of health and safety risks to our employees as well as to the communities that host our operations.

Our management of H&S at Yamana is comprised of two overlapping systems – our own internal management system, which focuses extensively on major risk management and ensuring procedural strength and the internationally recognized OSHAS 18001. Both systems are regularly audited and all operations maintained compliance in 2015.

Each of our operations also maintains extensive H&S teams, which report under the General Manager of that operation. Every operation has a joint H&S Employee-Management Safety Committee. At the corporate level, Yamana has regional directors (Southern and Northern operations), as well as a corporate manager, director and Senior Vice President responsible for Health and safety. The SVP of Health, Safety and Sustainable Development reports directly to the CEO and the Health, Safety and Sustainability Committee of the Board of Directors.
G4-DMA (Aspect - specific) Generic Disclosures on Management Approach - Aspect Specific
G4-LA5 Percentage of total workforce represented in formal joint management-worker health and safety committees that help monitor and advise on occupational health and safety programs 100% of our employees are represented by formal joint management-worker health and safety committees. Even our corporate office. The numbers of components of the committee each mine site is defined by law in each respective country.

The H&S committees are made up of senior, mid and lower level employees and report to the highest levels of the management at each operation. 
G4-LA6 Type of injury and rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and total number of work-related fatalities, by region and by gender See our CSR Report for a full overview of our Health & Safety performance. 
G4-LA7 Workers with high incidence or high risk of diseases related to their occupation All workers are monitored by medical examiners according the risk exposure. Where there are specific risks identified, appropriate precautions are taken - for example, in a location where silica is present, the occupational physician will provide lung control. The occupational control is according to the exposition risk. 
G4-LA8 Health and safety topics covered in formal agreements with trade unions All agreements cover aspects of H&S. These vary from site-to-site and from country-to-country, but all agreements cover Health and Safety. 

TRAINING AND EDUCATION

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-LA9 Average hours of training per year per employee by gender, and by employee category We currently do not have exact totals on the number of training hours. The following are the hours of available training hours per Level (not gender differentiated):
Manager & Above:  28 hours
Supervisor/ Sr. Professionals:  45 hours
Operators/ General Positions: 95 hours
G4-LA10 Programs for skills management and lifelong learning that support the continued employability of employees and assist them in managing career endings An Employee Learning Management System is available to all employees, main training includes compliance, health and safety, employee development, language courses and leadership skills. Employees at all levels and in all regions have access to training. All employees go through mandatory employee compliance training at the time of hire, including but not limited to: Code of Conduct and Corporate Governance Policies and Health & Safety Onboarding. Additional training is also held at each site
G4-LA11 Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews, by gender and by employee category All employees are evaluate through a performance revision taking into account the accomplishment of corporate, business unit, area and individual objectives as applicable. Performance criteria must be determined prior to the start of the performance period. All scorecards used must be forwarded to Corporate HR for record keeping. 

DIVERSITY AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-LA12 Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per employee category according to gender, age group, minority group membership, and other indicators of diversity Executive Committee:
(Sr. VP and above)
Number of  Members: 12
Gender: M - 11 F-1
Age groups: 30-40: (1) 40-50:(1) Over 50:(10)
Minority Groups: 2

Board of Directors:
Number of Board Members: 9
Gender: M - 7 F-2
Age groups: Over 50 (100%)
Minority Groups: 2

EQUAL REMUNERATION FOR WOMEN AND MEN

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-LA13 Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to men by employee category, by significant locations of operation Manager & Above: 8:10 (20% difference)  Sup./Professional: 8.8:10 (12%)  General Positions:  9.8:10 (2%)

SUPPLIER ASSESSMENT FOR LABOR PRACTICES

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-LA14 Percentage of new suppliers that were screened using labor practices criteria See SO-9
G4-LA15 Significant actual and potential negative impacts for labor practices in the supply chain and actions taken See SO-9

LABOR PRACTICES GRIEVANCE MECHANISMS

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-LA16 Number of grievances about labor practices filed, addressed, and resolved through formal grievance mechanisms 0 Grievances Reported 

SUB-CATEGORY: HUMAN RIGHTS

INVESTMENT

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-HR1 Total number and percentage of significant investment agreements and contracts that include human rights clauses or that underwent human rights screening All of investments undergo rigorous due diligence, which, depending on the jurisdiction, typically include various screens around environment, health and safety, community relations, labour practices, and other concern areas which encompass human rights. Yamana is in the process of adopting and refining a Health, Safety, Sustainability & Human Rights Due Diligence Tool. 
G4-HR2 Total hours of employee training on human rights policies or procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations, including the percentage of employees trained To date, we have not conducted human-rights specific training for our employees, beyond small, targeted groups within our operations (such as security and community relations teams)

100% of employees must complete an annual review and signoff on Yamana's Code of Conduct, which includes aspects of human rights. Many of our operations also require suppliers and contractors to signoff on Yamana's code of conduct. 

NON-DISCRIMINATION

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-HR3 Total number of incidents of discrimination and corrective actions taken No discrimination incidents registered in the period.

FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION AND COLLECTIVE BARGAINING

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-HR4 Operations and suppliers identified in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be violated or at significant risk, and measures taken to support these rights None

CHILD LABOR

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-HR5 Operations and suppliers identified as having significant risk for incidents of child labor, and measures taken to contribute to the effective abolition of child labor None

FORCED OR COMPULSORY LABOR

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Reportfor a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-HR6 Operations and suppliers identified as having significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labor, and measures to contribute to the elimination of all forms of forced or compulsory labor None

SECURITY PRACTICES

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-HR7 Percentage of security personnel trained in the organization's human rights policies or procedures that are relevant to operations Our operations have a split of both Yamana employees and contractors providing security services. In all instances, contractors and employees are required to undergo induction training, which includes a human rights component in the training. Also, employees receive annual training on Yamana's Code of Conduct and are required to sign the document, which includes aspects of human rights.

At operations with a slightly higher risk profile from a perspective of security and human rights risks, additional training is provided every two years by an accredited company. 

INDIGENOUS RIGHTS

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-MM5 Total number of operations taking place in or adjacent to indigenous people's territories, and number and percentage of operations or sites where there are formal agreements with indigenous peoples' communities  None

In Canada, three of our exploration projects are in the traditional territories of indigenous communities. In each instance, we have (or are working towards) formal exploration agreements. There are no disputes under any of these agreements.
G4-HR8 Total number of incidents of violations involving rights of indigenous peoples and actions taken None

ASSESSMENT

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-HR9 Total number and percentage of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or impact assessments Our operations have been evaluated internally from a risk and human rights perspective and none are deemed to be in a high or significant risk zone from this perspective. For this reason, our operations have not conducted comprehensive, standalone human rights impact assessments. However, many of the site's Environmental and Social Impact Assessment have aspects of human rights within their assessments, which were subsequently incorporated into management plans.

In 2016, Yamana will begin a the development of a revised human rights strategy to ensure the company remains current with emerging issues on human rights. 

SUPPLIER HUMAN RIGHTS ASSESSMENT

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-HR10 Percentage of new suppliers that were screened using human rights criteria Currently, we do not measure this. 
G4-HR11 Significant actual and potential negative human rights impacts in the supply chain and actions taken Currently, Yamana does not maintain an active human rights screen for suppliers. To the best of our knowledge, no significant actual or potential human rights impacts have been identified or brought to our attention through either formal or informal communication mechanisms.

Our 2016 human rights strategy will review potential risk areas in our supply chain the potential need for further screens.

At our Chapada mine in Brazil has initiated a supplier screening program to ensure minimum standards for our suppliers, with particular focus on the health and safety of employees. The program is requiring all suppliers to conform with Yamana's Code of Conduct.

HUMAN RIGHTS GRIEVANCE MECHANISMS

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-HR12 Number of grievances about human rights impacts filed, addressed, and resolved through formal grievance mechanisms None

SUB-CATEGORY: SOCIETY

LOCAL COMMUNITIES

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach Why are Community Relations a Material Issue for Yamana?
Establishing and maintaining a social license to operate has been of the most important, yet difficult to define priorities of the mining industry over the past decade. Communities are rightfully demanding to be part of all important conversations, from exploration through to closure. Over the years, this has shifted the balance of industry’s dialogue from out of the boardrooms of national and regional government offices to the streets and halls of host communities.

We view this growth of participatory governance as a positive shift that reflects a global democratization of information, to which the industry must adapt. We view our relationships with communities as one of the top priorities at our mining operations and similarly one of the key priorities for most of our stakeholders.

How do we Manage Community Relations at Yamana?
Dialogue is the foundation for everything we do at Yamana. We speak with our communities frequently, through multiple different venues/formats and in ways that promote transparency, accountability and ultimately trust. First and foremost, this allows us to understand what the community’s most material issues are, which can then be managed through participatory processes that hold all parties accountable.

Through strong dialogue, we can more effectively understand and manage both the impacts and the benefits our operations bring. Managing impacts, like noise, dust, vibration and increased traffic to an area are common impact issues that often cannot be completely eliminated, but through cooperative management approach can be effectively minimized.

Managing the benefits can also be a challenging endeavor, but an essential one to get right, as issues like jobs and contracts are of critical importance to the communities where we operate. Maximizing local jobs and procurement has been a focus of our community relations efforts at Yamana since the company’s inception and the numbers demonstrate that commitment, particularly when looking at our local procurement, where 17% of our purchasing was done through local communities in 2015. We have also strongly support a range of local community development programs, with a total of $5.38 million invested in 2015 alone.
G4-DMA (Aspect - specific) Generic Disclosures on Management Approach - Aspect Specific
G4-MM6 Number and description of significant disputes relating to land use, customary rights of local communities and indigenous peoples None
G4-MM7 The extent to which grievance mechanisms were used to resolve disputes relating to land use, customary rights of local communities and indigenous peoples, and the outcomes None
G4-SO1 Percentage of operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and development programs 100% of our operations have:
- Community Engagement Plans
- Community Development programs
- Social Risk/impact assessments (usually as part of an Environmental Impact Assessment)
- Social diagnosis (every 2 years)

Our community development investments typically feed into existing local/regional development plans and are always developed by communities themselves. In practice, Yamana actively tries to steer away from community development implementation.

For more information on our community development initiatives, see section G4-EC8.
G4-SO2 Operations with significant actual and potential negative impacts on local communities None. The majority of our operations are located anywhere from 10s to 100s of KMs from communities. The major impact on these communities is the creation of jobs through direct and indirect employment, as well as the company's direct contribution to social development. Those of are three operations located in particularly close proximity to host communities (Minera Florida in Chile and Jacobina in Brazil) encounter some negative impacts as they related to noise, dust and vibration, as well as increase vehicle traffic). We work with local communities to ensure these nuisances are minimal. 

ANTI-CORRUPTION

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-DMA (Aspect - specific) Generic Disclosures on Management Approach - Aspect Specific See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-SO3 Total number and percentage of operations assessed for risks related to corruption and the significant risks identified Our operations have been assessed for anti-bribery and corruption risks by a qualified third party and through internal assessments.
G4-SO4 Communication and training on anti-corruption policies and procedures All of Yamana's senior executives have received training around anti-bribery and corruption risks.

Our operations have been assessed for anti-bribery and corruption risks by third party and through internal assessments. In conjunction with that assessment, higher-risk departments at all operations (such as Government Relations, Procurement and Accounts Payable) as well operational managers have received training. To date, we have not tracked the precise number of individuals who have received that training.

See table below

# Enrolled # Completed Completion rate
Total 6103 6017 99%
G4-SO5 Confirmed incidents of corruption and actions taken None

PUBLIC POLICY

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-DMA (Aspect - specific) Generic Disclosures on Management Approach - Aspect Specific See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-SO6 Total value of political contributions by country and recipient/beneficiary A total of $3,437.41 was spent on sponsoring two dinners for political parties. Both in Argentina.

ANTI-COMPETITIVE BEHAVIOR

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-SO7 Total number of legal actions for anti-competitive behavior, anti-trust, and monopoly practices and their outcomes None

COMPLIANCE

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-SO8 Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and regulations Yamana received no fines in 2015.

Our Minera Florida operation in Chile receive a number of non-material environmentally-related non-compliances. See EN-29 for more detail. 

SUPPLIER ASSESSMENT FOR IMPACTS ON SOCIETY

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-SO9 Percentage of new suppliers that were screened using criteria for impacts on society We currently do not measure the percentage of suppliers that are screened in this regard. While this has not be a material concern for our stakeholders, many of our operations do require contractors and suppliers to sign Yamana's Code of Conduct. We have also initiated a supplier screening program at our Chapada mine which looks health & safety performance.
G4-SO10 Significant actual and potential negative impacts on society in the supply chain and actions taken None observed.

While not among the more material concerns expressed by our stakeholders, we nevertheless see the importance of ensuring high ethical, human rights and environmental standards. Going forward, we intend to increasing the number of suppliers that are screened going forward.

GRIEVANCE MECHANISMS FOR IMPACTS ON SOCIETY

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-DMA (Aspect - specific) Generic Disclosures on Management Approach - Aspect Specific See our CSR Report for a full overview of aspects deemed as most material to Yamana and its stakeholders.
G4-SO11 Number of grievances about impacts on society filed, addressed, and resolved through formal grievance mechanisms See table below

Grievances Resolved
Jacobina 4 4
Chapada 11 11
Minera Florida 1 1
Pilar 4 4
Information for other operations is not currently available.

ARTISANAL AND SMALL-SCALE MINING

G4-MM8 Number (and percentage) of company operating sites where artisanal and small-scale mining (asm) take place on, or adjacent to, the site; the associated risks and the actions taken to manage and mitigate these risks Our Jacobina operation has small scale mining in the general vicinity of the mine site, but not directly adjacent to it.

RESETTLEMENT

G4-MM9 Sites where resettlements took place, the number of households resettled in each, and how their livelihoods were affected in the process.  None of our operations have required resettlement. Our C1 Santa Luz operation in Brazil will likely require some resettlement in future years (approximately 82 households). 

CLOSURE PLANNING

G4-MM10 Number and percentage of operations with closure plans All operations have active closure plans with appropriately allocated financial provisions, which total $287.5 M for the company, including sites that are closed.

See table below

Yamana Gold Inc.
ARO by mine / projects
Undiscounted cash flow in USD

Mine/Project $
Chapada 84,299,709
Beartrack 26,353,880
El Penon 21,869,302
Malartic 21,293,469
Minera Florida 20,448,889
MFB 20,121,663
Jacobina 19,563,281
MASA 18,970,726
RMK 13,153,627
Pilar (CGO) 9,090,921
Ernesto/Pau-a-Pique (EPP) 8,976,415
Mercedes 8,859,498
C1 Santa Luz 7,753,270
Agua De La Falda (Jeronimo) 4,247,453
Upper Beaver 1,190,015
Austin Gold Venture 1,137,813
Mcbean 181,719
Victoria Creek 18,962
287,530,612

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach All of our operations maintain a emergency response plans and teams, which conduct both desktop and live scenario training on a regular basis. Emergency response teams also receive special training for a range of different scenarios.
One of the most significant concerns of local communities is related to tailings dam failures. No where is the more relevant than in Brazil, as the 2015 Samarco tailings failure lead to the death of 17 community members. All Yamana TSFs have an Emergency Response Plan (ERP). ERPs are built around worst case scenarios (including dam breaks) and include procedures for:
The protection of personnel; notification of emergency services, neighboring communities and resource management agencies, as well as longer term remediation actions.  The General Manager for each operation is responsible for the ERP.
In 2016, Yamana will review and test all the operational ERPs, including reviews with external stakeholders.

SUB-CATEGORY: PRODUCT RESPONSIBILITY

COMPLIANCE

G4-DMA Generic Disclosures on Management Approach N/A
G4-PR9 Monetary value of significant fines for non-compliance with laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and services N/A

MATERIALS STEWARDSHIP

G4-DMA Programs and progress relating to materials stewardship N/A

Disclaimer

You are now leaving the Yamana Gold Inc. website to go to an independent third party website. Yamana has no control over information at third party sites hyperlinked to this one. These links are being provided for the convenience of the users of this website and Yamana does not endorse and is not responsible or liable for the content, nature or reliability of any linked website or any link contained in a linked website. Yamana takes no responsibility for monitoring, updating, supplementing or correcting any information on any linked website and makes no representation or warranties regarding such information.

NON-GAAP INFORMATION

Yamana discloses certain non-GAAP measures including Cash costs per ounce of gold, Cash costs per ounce of silver, Co-product cash costs per ounce of gold, Co-product cash costs per ounce of silver, Co-product cash costs per pound of copper, All-in sustaining costs per ounce of gold, All-in sustaining costs per ounce of silver, All-in sustaining co-product costs per ounce of gold, and All-in sustaining co-product costs per ounce of silver to supplement its Consolidated Financial Statements, which are presented in accordance with IFRS. The term IFRS and generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) are used interchangeably. The Company believes that these measures, together with measures determined in accordance with IFRS, provide investors with an improved ability to evaluate the underlying performance of the Company. Non-GAAP measures do not have any standardized meaning prescribed under IFRS, and therefore they may not be comparable to similar measures employed by other companies. The data is intended to provide additional information and should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for measures of performance prepared in accordance with IFRS.

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